Traditional recipes

Oxtail Patties

Oxtail Patties

In a pan, sear and brown oxtail for 3-5 minutes.

In a stewing pot, pour in chicken stock, Pickapeppa soy sauce, red wine, garlic, brown sugar, carrots, anise, mango purée, Scotch bonnet pepper, and ginger slices.

Stir to mix the ingredients together.

Bring to a boil and then reduce to a simmer.

Add the seared oxtail to the pot. Put the lid on top and allow to cook on a low heat for 2-3 hours until tender. The meat should be fall-off-the-bone tender when pierced with a fork.

Remove oxtail from sauce. Debone the meat and chop roughly into small pieces, then stir into the sauce and set aside to cool.

The oxtail filling is now ready to be put into the puff pastry circles.

Preheat oven to 370 degrees F.

Take pre-made puff pastry sheet and lay it on floured table or cutting board.

Cut out 3-inch circles.

Place a heaped tablespoon of the meat filling onto one side of the circle.

Fold the circle in half and press a fork along the pastry’s edges to seal. Gently use fork to pierce top of pastry to allow steam to exit.

Continue until all dough circles and filling are used up.

Place in a single layer on baking sheet and brush with egg wash and cook in preheated oven till the pastries begin to become golden brown (about 20 minutes).

Place patties on a platter and garnish with baby greens. Enjoy!!!


Braised Oxtail

Although back in the day oxtail was literally the tail of an ox, nowadays it refers to any tail coming from any cattle, male or female, but usually a steer. Oxtail is a singular but wonderful piece of meat. Thick at one end and skinny at the other with a bone running down the center, oxtail is sold cut into sections, which means you'll usually get a few big meaty pieces and a few really little ones. Because processing this cut is labor-intensive as it needs to be skinned and butchered with skill, the tail is one of the most expensive cuts of meat per pound—and 50 percent of its weight is just bone. But it is also one of the most succulent cuts when properly prepared.

Once considered to be just scraps from a butchered cow, the oxtail's appeal has been discovered by chefs and gourmands and become a staple in modern cuisine, even if Caribbean, Spanish, and Hispanic cultures have treated this cut with reverence for hundreds of years.

The oxtail has a lot of cartilage and connective tissue, so it needs to be cooked low and slow for a long time using moist heat. One such method is braising, which melts away all those sinewy bits and turns them into gelatin, yielding flavorful meat and a very rich and delicious sauce. Pressure cookers are also an option to cook oxtail, but nothing beats time and patience. Oxtail is best served with something to soak up the sauce, like pasta, roasted garlic mashed potatoes, or creamy polenta.


Braised Oxtail

Although back in the day oxtail was literally the tail of an ox, nowadays it refers to any tail coming from any cattle, male or female, but usually a steer. Oxtail is a singular but wonderful piece of meat. Thick at one end and skinny at the other with a bone running down the center, oxtail is sold cut into sections, which means you'll usually get a few big meaty pieces and a few really little ones. Because processing this cut is labor-intensive as it needs to be skinned and butchered with skill, the tail is one of the most expensive cuts of meat per pound—and 50 percent of its weight is just bone. But it is also one of the most succulent cuts when properly prepared.

Once considered to be just scraps from a butchered cow, the oxtail's appeal has been discovered by chefs and gourmands and become a staple in modern cuisine, even if Caribbean, Spanish, and Hispanic cultures have treated this cut with reverence for hundreds of years.

The oxtail has a lot of cartilage and connective tissue, so it needs to be cooked low and slow for a long time using moist heat. One such method is braising, which melts away all those sinewy bits and turns them into gelatin, yielding flavorful meat and a very rich and delicious sauce. Pressure cookers are also an option to cook oxtail, but nothing beats time and patience. Oxtail is best served with something to soak up the sauce, like pasta, roasted garlic mashed potatoes, or creamy polenta.


Braised Oxtail

Although back in the day oxtail was literally the tail of an ox, nowadays it refers to any tail coming from any cattle, male or female, but usually a steer. Oxtail is a singular but wonderful piece of meat. Thick at one end and skinny at the other with a bone running down the center, oxtail is sold cut into sections, which means you'll usually get a few big meaty pieces and a few really little ones. Because processing this cut is labor-intensive as it needs to be skinned and butchered with skill, the tail is one of the most expensive cuts of meat per pound—and 50 percent of its weight is just bone. But it is also one of the most succulent cuts when properly prepared.

Once considered to be just scraps from a butchered cow, the oxtail's appeal has been discovered by chefs and gourmands and become a staple in modern cuisine, even if Caribbean, Spanish, and Hispanic cultures have treated this cut with reverence for hundreds of years.

The oxtail has a lot of cartilage and connective tissue, so it needs to be cooked low and slow for a long time using moist heat. One such method is braising, which melts away all those sinewy bits and turns them into gelatin, yielding flavorful meat and a very rich and delicious sauce. Pressure cookers are also an option to cook oxtail, but nothing beats time and patience. Oxtail is best served with something to soak up the sauce, like pasta, roasted garlic mashed potatoes, or creamy polenta.


Braised Oxtail

Although back in the day oxtail was literally the tail of an ox, nowadays it refers to any tail coming from any cattle, male or female, but usually a steer. Oxtail is a singular but wonderful piece of meat. Thick at one end and skinny at the other with a bone running down the center, oxtail is sold cut into sections, which means you'll usually get a few big meaty pieces and a few really little ones. Because processing this cut is labor-intensive as it needs to be skinned and butchered with skill, the tail is one of the most expensive cuts of meat per pound—and 50 percent of its weight is just bone. But it is also one of the most succulent cuts when properly prepared.

Once considered to be just scraps from a butchered cow, the oxtail's appeal has been discovered by chefs and gourmands and become a staple in modern cuisine, even if Caribbean, Spanish, and Hispanic cultures have treated this cut with reverence for hundreds of years.

The oxtail has a lot of cartilage and connective tissue, so it needs to be cooked low and slow for a long time using moist heat. One such method is braising, which melts away all those sinewy bits and turns them into gelatin, yielding flavorful meat and a very rich and delicious sauce. Pressure cookers are also an option to cook oxtail, but nothing beats time and patience. Oxtail is best served with something to soak up the sauce, like pasta, roasted garlic mashed potatoes, or creamy polenta.


Braised Oxtail

Although back in the day oxtail was literally the tail of an ox, nowadays it refers to any tail coming from any cattle, male or female, but usually a steer. Oxtail is a singular but wonderful piece of meat. Thick at one end and skinny at the other with a bone running down the center, oxtail is sold cut into sections, which means you'll usually get a few big meaty pieces and a few really little ones. Because processing this cut is labor-intensive as it needs to be skinned and butchered with skill, the tail is one of the most expensive cuts of meat per pound—and 50 percent of its weight is just bone. But it is also one of the most succulent cuts when properly prepared.

Once considered to be just scraps from a butchered cow, the oxtail's appeal has been discovered by chefs and gourmands and become a staple in modern cuisine, even if Caribbean, Spanish, and Hispanic cultures have treated this cut with reverence for hundreds of years.

The oxtail has a lot of cartilage and connective tissue, so it needs to be cooked low and slow for a long time using moist heat. One such method is braising, which melts away all those sinewy bits and turns them into gelatin, yielding flavorful meat and a very rich and delicious sauce. Pressure cookers are also an option to cook oxtail, but nothing beats time and patience. Oxtail is best served with something to soak up the sauce, like pasta, roasted garlic mashed potatoes, or creamy polenta.


Braised Oxtail

Although back in the day oxtail was literally the tail of an ox, nowadays it refers to any tail coming from any cattle, male or female, but usually a steer. Oxtail is a singular but wonderful piece of meat. Thick at one end and skinny at the other with a bone running down the center, oxtail is sold cut into sections, which means you'll usually get a few big meaty pieces and a few really little ones. Because processing this cut is labor-intensive as it needs to be skinned and butchered with skill, the tail is one of the most expensive cuts of meat per pound—and 50 percent of its weight is just bone. But it is also one of the most succulent cuts when properly prepared.

Once considered to be just scraps from a butchered cow, the oxtail's appeal has been discovered by chefs and gourmands and become a staple in modern cuisine, even if Caribbean, Spanish, and Hispanic cultures have treated this cut with reverence for hundreds of years.

The oxtail has a lot of cartilage and connective tissue, so it needs to be cooked low and slow for a long time using moist heat. One such method is braising, which melts away all those sinewy bits and turns them into gelatin, yielding flavorful meat and a very rich and delicious sauce. Pressure cookers are also an option to cook oxtail, but nothing beats time and patience. Oxtail is best served with something to soak up the sauce, like pasta, roasted garlic mashed potatoes, or creamy polenta.


Braised Oxtail

Although back in the day oxtail was literally the tail of an ox, nowadays it refers to any tail coming from any cattle, male or female, but usually a steer. Oxtail is a singular but wonderful piece of meat. Thick at one end and skinny at the other with a bone running down the center, oxtail is sold cut into sections, which means you'll usually get a few big meaty pieces and a few really little ones. Because processing this cut is labor-intensive as it needs to be skinned and butchered with skill, the tail is one of the most expensive cuts of meat per pound—and 50 percent of its weight is just bone. But it is also one of the most succulent cuts when properly prepared.

Once considered to be just scraps from a butchered cow, the oxtail's appeal has been discovered by chefs and gourmands and become a staple in modern cuisine, even if Caribbean, Spanish, and Hispanic cultures have treated this cut with reverence for hundreds of years.

The oxtail has a lot of cartilage and connective tissue, so it needs to be cooked low and slow for a long time using moist heat. One such method is braising, which melts away all those sinewy bits and turns them into gelatin, yielding flavorful meat and a very rich and delicious sauce. Pressure cookers are also an option to cook oxtail, but nothing beats time and patience. Oxtail is best served with something to soak up the sauce, like pasta, roasted garlic mashed potatoes, or creamy polenta.


Braised Oxtail

Although back in the day oxtail was literally the tail of an ox, nowadays it refers to any tail coming from any cattle, male or female, but usually a steer. Oxtail is a singular but wonderful piece of meat. Thick at one end and skinny at the other with a bone running down the center, oxtail is sold cut into sections, which means you'll usually get a few big meaty pieces and a few really little ones. Because processing this cut is labor-intensive as it needs to be skinned and butchered with skill, the tail is one of the most expensive cuts of meat per pound—and 50 percent of its weight is just bone. But it is also one of the most succulent cuts when properly prepared.

Once considered to be just scraps from a butchered cow, the oxtail's appeal has been discovered by chefs and gourmands and become a staple in modern cuisine, even if Caribbean, Spanish, and Hispanic cultures have treated this cut with reverence for hundreds of years.

The oxtail has a lot of cartilage and connective tissue, so it needs to be cooked low and slow for a long time using moist heat. One such method is braising, which melts away all those sinewy bits and turns them into gelatin, yielding flavorful meat and a very rich and delicious sauce. Pressure cookers are also an option to cook oxtail, but nothing beats time and patience. Oxtail is best served with something to soak up the sauce, like pasta, roasted garlic mashed potatoes, or creamy polenta.


Braised Oxtail

Although back in the day oxtail was literally the tail of an ox, nowadays it refers to any tail coming from any cattle, male or female, but usually a steer. Oxtail is a singular but wonderful piece of meat. Thick at one end and skinny at the other with a bone running down the center, oxtail is sold cut into sections, which means you'll usually get a few big meaty pieces and a few really little ones. Because processing this cut is labor-intensive as it needs to be skinned and butchered with skill, the tail is one of the most expensive cuts of meat per pound—and 50 percent of its weight is just bone. But it is also one of the most succulent cuts when properly prepared.

Once considered to be just scraps from a butchered cow, the oxtail's appeal has been discovered by chefs and gourmands and become a staple in modern cuisine, even if Caribbean, Spanish, and Hispanic cultures have treated this cut with reverence for hundreds of years.

The oxtail has a lot of cartilage and connective tissue, so it needs to be cooked low and slow for a long time using moist heat. One such method is braising, which melts away all those sinewy bits and turns them into gelatin, yielding flavorful meat and a very rich and delicious sauce. Pressure cookers are also an option to cook oxtail, but nothing beats time and patience. Oxtail is best served with something to soak up the sauce, like pasta, roasted garlic mashed potatoes, or creamy polenta.


Braised Oxtail

Although back in the day oxtail was literally the tail of an ox, nowadays it refers to any tail coming from any cattle, male or female, but usually a steer. Oxtail is a singular but wonderful piece of meat. Thick at one end and skinny at the other with a bone running down the center, oxtail is sold cut into sections, which means you'll usually get a few big meaty pieces and a few really little ones. Because processing this cut is labor-intensive as it needs to be skinned and butchered with skill, the tail is one of the most expensive cuts of meat per pound—and 50 percent of its weight is just bone. But it is also one of the most succulent cuts when properly prepared.

Once considered to be just scraps from a butchered cow, the oxtail's appeal has been discovered by chefs and gourmands and become a staple in modern cuisine, even if Caribbean, Spanish, and Hispanic cultures have treated this cut with reverence for hundreds of years.

The oxtail has a lot of cartilage and connective tissue, so it needs to be cooked low and slow for a long time using moist heat. One such method is braising, which melts away all those sinewy bits and turns them into gelatin, yielding flavorful meat and a very rich and delicious sauce. Pressure cookers are also an option to cook oxtail, but nothing beats time and patience. Oxtail is best served with something to soak up the sauce, like pasta, roasted garlic mashed potatoes, or creamy polenta.