Traditional recipes

Savory Cherry Compote

Savory Cherry Compote

Savory cherry chutney-like compote made with fresh cherries, walnuts, shallots, rosemary, honey, and Port, perfect with pork, chicken, or duck.

Photography Credit:Elise Bauer

When fresh cherries are in season, it’s kind of hard to resist eating as many as you can. Actually, at our house, that goes for any stone fruit.

But sometimes, sometimes we have even more cherries than we can justifiably eat, and common sense kicks in and we think, uh, maybe we should fill up on more than just fruit? Protein perhaps?

Dinner beckons yet that big bowl of cherries eyes us temptingly. Dilemma solved.

A quick and easy savory compote made with fresh cherries, walnuts, rosemary, and shallots in a wine reduction makes an excellent accompaniment to pork, chicken, or even duck.

Serve with pork chops, pork tenderloin, seared duck breasts, or baked chicken. Yum!

Savory Cherry Compote Recipe

Ingredients

  • 3 tablespoons extra virgin olive oil
  • 2 tablespoons minced shallots (can sub red onion)
  • 2 1/2 cups pitted sweet cherries, quartered
  • 1 cup walnuts, chopped
  • 1 teaspoon minced fresh rosemary
  • Salt and pepper to taste
  • 1/4 cup Port, red wine, kirsch, cassis, or cherry juice (or water)
  • 1 tablespoon honey
  • Cherry pitter

Method

1 Cook the shallots: Heat the olive oil in a pan in a frying pan on medium heat. Add the shallots and cook them until they just begin to color on the edges, about 2-3 minutes. Stir a few times while they’re cooking.

2 Add the walnuts, rosemary and cherries and stir everything to combine. Turn the heat down to medium and cook until the cherries are soft, about 4-5 minutes, stirring occasionally. Add a little black pepper and taste for salt.

3 Pour in the Port, wine, kirsch or cassis and the honey, and stir again. Boil this down slowly until the softening cherries and the liquid cook down to a syrupy texture.

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Pan-Seared Duck with a Savory Cherry Compote

We have enjoyed many different preparations of duck, especially during our time and Europe. Although restaurants here in Colorado tend to offer various meals of game, it isn’t necessarily easy to find them in the store. While we were living in Frankfurt, our butcher always had lamb, duck, goose, and other gamier items available, but unfortunately it just isn’t the case here. We were able to get a whole duck, but since we were just cooking for the two of us, we decided to cut it into parts which gave us a boneless duck breast and a duck thigh with the leg still on. We often cut up a whole chicken, but duck is a little more difficult, although worth the effort. By cutting the duck into pieces, it allows you to pan sear it as opposed to roasting it and that makes it even more tender. We froze one half of the duck to have at a later date and cooked up the breast and thigh for dinner. Duck goes really well with fruits such as orange or cherry, so we made a cherry compote to go with the duck. The compote (or sauce) was more savory than sweet, which is what we prefer. It was extremely delicious and definitely reminded us of duck that we’ve eaten during several of our travels.

INGREDIENTS

  • 1/2 Duck – breast deboned and thigh deboned with the exception of the leg (if you can get two deboned breasts, that would work as well)
  • 1 Shallot – chopped
  • 2 Garlic Cloves – minced
  • 1 cup Cherries – fresh or frozen, pitted
  • 1/2 cup Chicken Stock
  • 2 tbsp Cherry Preserves
  • 2 tsp Honey – preferably fresh or organic
  • 2 tsp Rosemary – chopped
  • 1/2 tsp Garlic Powder
  • 2 tbsp Fresh Lemon Juice
  • 1 tbsp Unsalted Butter
  • 3 tbsp Vegetable Oil
  • Salt and Pepper to taste

INSTRUCTIONS

Using a very sharp knife, score the skin of the duck. Season the duck with salt, pepper, garlic powder, and 1 teaspoon of the rosemary. Let the duck come to room temperature. While the duck is coming up to room temperature, heat 1 tablespoon of the oil in a small pot. Add the shallots and cook for 3 to 4 minutes or until the shallots are soft and translucent. Add the garlic and cook for another minute just to let the garlic bloom. Add the cherries, cherry preserves, chicken stock, honey, and the remaining teaspoon of rosemary. Continue to simmer for 10 minutes while the duck is cooking. When the sauce has slightly thickened, add the butter and lemon juice and keep warm until the duck is finished. Heat the vegetable oil in a cast-iron skillet to medium-high heat. Place the duck skin-side down and don’t touch it until the skin has released from the bottom of the skillet, at least 5 to 10 minutes. Once the skin is browned and the fat has rendered, turn the heat down to medium and flip the duck over to finish cooking, about another 8 to 10 minutes (or until an instant read thermometer reads 160 degrees). To serve, drizzle the cherry compote over the duck and place the rest in a bowl for people to add more as they eat.


The best cherries have taut, shiny skin. Look closely!

A peppy cherry dressing is a natural pairing for pork.

Recipes you want to make. Cooking advice that works. Restaurant recommendations you trust.

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  1. First, we will sterilize the jars and lids by boiling them in a deep pan with water or put them in the oven at a temperature of 220 degrees. I let them 15-20 minutes to sterilize.
  2. We will wash the cherries well carefully, clean them from the stems and let them drain the water. We can also wipe them with a clean napkin.
  3. In a saucepan, add sugar and water. Stir until the sugar dissolves, and let the syrup simmer for another 5 minutes.
  4. Remove syrup from the heat to cool slightly. Meanwhile, fill the jars with cherries. I filled jars almost full, letting two fingers space free down the throat.
  5. We will add warm or lukewarm syrup, but not cold at all.
  6. Close the jars tightly and place them in a pot of water to simmer for 20 minutes. Test the jars upside down if they leak or closed properly before boiling them.
    Passing the boiling time, take them out of hot water. Let jars upside down above a kitchen napkin cool completely. If you boil them standing and covered with water, we will let them cool inside the water. Test lids if they move to press with your finger after they cool.
  7. Store the jars in a dry, cool place, away from light. We will open them after a few months.

Bon Appetit!


Rosemary Cherry Compote

This Rosemary Cherry Compote is what you should make with all those beautiful fresh cherries. Cherries, rosemary, sugar, balsamic vinegar, salt & pepper. It goes well in both savory and sweet dishes!

The past weekend, we were in Washington State visiting my cousin Mandy and her husband Robbie. They took us cherry picking. I have been wanting to pick cherries for a while. The only problem is that cherry season is very short in California, just about 1 month. We were supposed to go 2 weeks ago in Los Angeles, but the farm was unexpectedly closed on that day. I was very disappointed and thought I may not have a chance to go this year. But luckily, I got to pick cherries after all, and even better in Yakima.

There were lots of cherries on the tree. The trees are not tall at all as imagined. We can easily reach the cherries without any ladder. They have two varieties, rainier and bing. We got a little bit of both. It took us less than 20 minutes to pick 3 pounds. We ate some at the hotel and brought the rest home. The cherries were so fresh and firm that they hold up really well on the plane.

When I got home, I knew exactly what I wanted to do with the cherries. This compote has been on my mind for a while. It’s easy to make and it can be used with many different things. It’s also a great way to extend the life of fresh cherries.

First, pit the cherries. Then combine with sugar, and rosemary. Cook until cherries are softened. Transfer the cherries to a bowl, but continue to reduce the liquid until thickened. Add the liquid back to the cherries. Stir in balsamic vinegar, salt and pepper. So simple! It’s sweet, but savory and earthy. Perfect with pork chop, sandwiches, cheese platter, ice cream, yogurt, cake and many more. It also make a great homemade gift too!

Next week, I will share an appetizer recipe that uses this compote. Stay tuned!


Sweet or Savory Cherry Compote

1. Heat the cherries, sugar, and water in a saucepan over medium-high
heat. Bring to a boil, then reduce heat to low. Cover and simmer for about 15
minutes, or until cherries are tender and sauce is thickened. (The sauce should coat the spoon.)

Ready-to-serve compote



Serve warm or cold over
plain cake, vanilla ice cream, or plain or vanilla-flavored yogurt.

Use less sugar, or omit it completely, add 3/4 teaspoon
finely chopped fresh rosemary to the cherries as they cook, and finally, add 1
teaspoon balsamic vinegar (optional) and black pepper after compote is removed
from the heat.


Savory Cherry Compote

Cherries are in season from June through August in North America, and there is nothing quite like biting into a sweet, fresh cherry. Everyone knows cherry pie, it’s a classic. But how about turning tradition on its head and doing savory cherries?

This recipe uses cherries in a unique and delicious way – a compote over couscous. The subtle flavor of shallot and the crunch of pecans temper the sweet cherries with earthiness. A splash of red wine adds depth and fresh summer herbs rosemary and thyme round out the dish. This is an elegant and unexpected preparation of a summertime favorite.

Serve Savory Cherry Compote over couscous or your favorite grain as a vegan side dish. Gluten-free couscous is available from Lunberg, it’s made of brown rice and tastes great. Compote is also wonderful over steamed brown rice, pan-seared tofu steaks or baked sweet potato discs. Using fresh cherries does take a little prep time – you have to stem and pit them by hand. It’s worth the extra work when you taste this recipe, though! In a pinch for time? Use frozen and thawed sweet cherries.


Sour cherries have a short season. If you can't find fresh ones, use quick-frozen or canned sour cherries.

In this pie, fresh Bing cherries combine with dried tart cherries, preserved Morello cherries, and whole spices to create a deep red, intensely flavored pie.

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A Note on Consistency of Your Compote

Compote, by definition, is made using whole fruit, so it's typically pretty chunky compared to a jam or jelly. I prefer to mash half of my cherries and leave the rest halved. If you want your compote to be less chunky, you can mash all of your cherries. It's really just a personal preference.


5 Sweet and Savory Cherry Recipes

A simple salad of peppery arugula, crunchy Marcona almonds, thinly shaved Parmesan, and sweet golden cherries is an unexpected and satisfying way to start the week.

Arugula, Golden Cherries, Marcona Almonds and Parmigiano-Reggiano

Intricately decorated lattice pies are lovely, but not exactly weeknight-friendly. Instead, top lightly sweetened fresh cherries with a nutty oat crumble and bake until browned and bubbly.

Pistachio-Cherry Crumble

Pan-sear pork tenderloin to a golden brown and top with a piquant sauce made with cherries, red wine, and thyme. The recipe calls for frozen cherries, but if you have good fresh ones, all the better.

Spiced Pork Tenderloin with Cherry-Thyme Pan Sauce

Warm, fluffy buttermilk waffles are a decadent treat when topped with homemade cherry compote. Finish the dish with a dollop of yogurt and pair with crisp bacon or sausage patties.

Buttermilk Waffles with Cherry-Almond Sauce

Kick off the holiday weekend with these enormous sweet-and-smoky beef ribs doused in a spicy cherry-laced barbecue sauce.

Dinosaur Bones with Chipotle-Cherry Barbecue Sauce

Since 1995, Epicurious has been the ultimate food resource for the home cook, with daily kitchen tips, fun cooking videos, and, oh yeah, over 33,000 recipes.

© 2021 Condé Nast. All rights reserved. Use of this site constitutes acceptance of our User Agreement and Privacy Policy and Cookie Statement and Your California Privacy Rights. Epicurious may earn a portion of sales from products that are purchased through our site as part of our Affiliate Partnerships with retailers. The material on this site may not be reproduced, distributed, transmitted, cached or otherwise used, except with the prior written permission of Condé Nast. Ad Choices


How to Pit Cherry for Easy Cherry Compote

The easiest, cleanest and possibly quickest way to pit cherries is to use a cherry pitter tool. However, you don’t have to hurry out and buy another tool to clutter up your kitchen drawer if you don’t pit cherries often. There are two ways you can do this quite easily, albeit slightly messier.

  1. Use a straw in place of the pitter. Push the straw through the end with the stem (after you have removed the stem), the pit should get pushed out the other end. This is easiest with very ripe cherries. It is slightly messier than a real cherry pitter but it gets the work done.
  2. Use a paring knife and cut a cherry in half, length wise. Twist it open like you would with an avocado. The pit will still be attached to half of the cherry, just use your finger or knife to pry it out. This is quite a bit messier and will get cherry juice all over your fingers, be sure to wear an apron.

So depending on whether you want whole cherries or halved in your compote, you can choose your pitting method accordingly. Halved cherries will cook slightly faster and easily disintegrate into the compote.

This easy Cherry Compote is made very similar to this easy Strawberry Compote using orange juice and just a small amount of sugar to bring out the flavor of the cherries. At the end of the cooking process, when the compote is slightly cool, I recommend adding a splash of almond extract to the compote to enhance the flavor since cherry and almond go well together.

More Compote and Topping Recipes

If you make this recipe, please let me know! Leave a comment, rate it and don’t forget to tag me @wildwildwhisk on Instagram. I’d love to see what’s cooking up in your kitchen. Cheers!


Watch the video: Cherry Mango Salmon with Savory Cherry Quesadillas (November 2021).