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Americans Were Adventurous With Food Delivery This Year, GrubHub Says

Americans Were Adventurous With Food Delivery This Year, GrubHub Says

As you look back semi-fondly on 2015’s highlights, you will probably notice that many of your best and, admittedly, laziest memories began with ordering takeout. GrubHub understands your addiction to ordering in, particularly if you live in a big city, and has analyzed its customer data from this year. The biggest overall trend was a noted spike in international cuisines. The most popular dishes ordered this year were diverse in geographic and cultural scope.

“This year, we've seen our diners branch out and explore new foods that are offered through our platform,” Kaitlyn Carl, media relations coordinator for GrubHub told The Daily Meal. “Across the nation, we saw spikes in various types of ramen, as well as a rise in tapas and gourmet street tacos.”

In addition, 2015 saw a slight uptick in healthy food takeout, particularly vegetables like Brussels sprouts. The volume of orders for paleo, gluten free, organic, free range, grass-fed and GMO-free increased 18 percent from 2014 to 2015. People were also obsessed with unique spices like gochujang, a Korean condiment made from fermented soybeans, chiles, and glutinous rice, which spiked a whopping 228 percent.

Even though GrubHub may have noted a slight preference for healthier fare, Americans certainly continued to scarf down a diverse array of fried, cheese and-sauce-covered comfort foods. These are the “hottest” foods of the year to come into contact with the iconic smiley-face bag, ranked by percentage increase over last year's orders:

• Taco al pastor – 277.3%

• Spicy miso ramen –220%

• Chicken tikka masala –136%

• Tonkotsu ramen –133.4%

• Deep-dish pizza –101.8%

• Patatas bravas –99.7%

• Brisket – 90.8%

• Ham and cheese empandas – 87.8%

• Kale caesar salad – 84.5%

• Poutine – 83.1%


1 in 4 delivery drivers admit to tasting your food before delivering it

Food delivery apps are becoming increasingly popular, even in suburban areas of the U.S. But is convenience worth it if delivery drivers are sampling diners' dinners?

A recent survey, which was commissioned and conducted by restaurant food supplier and distributor US Foods, asked both consumers and delivery workers about their "habits and pain points" when it comes to ordering and delivering meals.

The responses revealed some unique insight as to how long people will actually wait to get their food, attitudes toward tipping and more. Unfortunately, it also revealed some unsettling information. For example, out of nearly 500 delivery workers surveyed, more 25% said they'd munched on food from an order. Yikes.

Apparently the temptation of a delicious meal is just too hard to resist — especially when it's not yours.

To conduct the survey, US Foods surveyed 1,518 American adults who said that they have used food delivery apps. Respondents’ ages ranged from 18-77, with a median age of 31. They also surveyed 497 American adults who "identified as having worked as a deliverer for at least one food delivery app." Those respondents had a median age of 30.

US Foods found that the average American has two food delivery apps on their smartphone, from which they order about three times a month. The most popular apps included Uber Eats, Grubhub, DoorDash and Postmates — all of which are third-party delivery services that partner with restaurants and grocery stores to bring food to peoples' homes.

Emails to Uber Eats, Grubhub and Doordash regarding the study were not immediately returned.

On Wednesday, a Postmates spokesperson provided the following statement to TODAY: "At Postmates, nothing is more important to us than the safety and wellbeing of our entire community, which is why we require each person who completes a delivery using Postmates to expressly agree that all food and goods delivered will arrive in a tamper free form and in compliance with all applicable food health and safety laws.

"While reports of food tampering represent less than 0.06% of cases reported to our Trust & Safety team, we take any report of health safety violations very seriously, which is why we have built trust & security into our product design and network operations from day one have specific policies and community standards in place to prevent tampering investigate all reported order irregularities take prompt action against any accounts suspected of tampering with orders and work with any impacted customers to ensure a prompt resolution of any issues they report. We're also engaged in active discussions with lawmakers and other stakeholders to develop a regulatory framework for the safety of food delivery."

Related

Food This pizza shop is helping pet owners find their lost dogs and cats

An Acosta study from July 2018 showed that since 2015, "convenient meal solutions," like food delivery, have spiked in every category and age group, particularly among families with children and millennials. In 2016, research conducted by McKinsey & Company estimated that the online food delivery market will grow 4% every year for the next five years.

Encouraged by big chains, fast food fans have also been prompted to download delivery apps, since using third-party drivers to promote deals has become increasingly popular.


1 in 4 delivery drivers admit to tasting your food before delivering it

Food delivery apps are becoming increasingly popular, even in suburban areas of the U.S. But is convenience worth it if delivery drivers are sampling diners' dinners?

A recent survey, which was commissioned and conducted by restaurant food supplier and distributor US Foods, asked both consumers and delivery workers about their "habits and pain points" when it comes to ordering and delivering meals.

The responses revealed some unique insight as to how long people will actually wait to get their food, attitudes toward tipping and more. Unfortunately, it also revealed some unsettling information. For example, out of nearly 500 delivery workers surveyed, more 25% said they'd munched on food from an order. Yikes.

Apparently the temptation of a delicious meal is just too hard to resist — especially when it's not yours.

To conduct the survey, US Foods surveyed 1,518 American adults who said that they have used food delivery apps. Respondents’ ages ranged from 18-77, with a median age of 31. They also surveyed 497 American adults who "identified as having worked as a deliverer for at least one food delivery app." Those respondents had a median age of 30.

US Foods found that the average American has two food delivery apps on their smartphone, from which they order about three times a month. The most popular apps included Uber Eats, Grubhub, DoorDash and Postmates — all of which are third-party delivery services that partner with restaurants and grocery stores to bring food to peoples' homes.

Emails to Uber Eats, Grubhub and Doordash regarding the study were not immediately returned.

On Wednesday, a Postmates spokesperson provided the following statement to TODAY: "At Postmates, nothing is more important to us than the safety and wellbeing of our entire community, which is why we require each person who completes a delivery using Postmates to expressly agree that all food and goods delivered will arrive in a tamper free form and in compliance with all applicable food health and safety laws.

"While reports of food tampering represent less than 0.06% of cases reported to our Trust & Safety team, we take any report of health safety violations very seriously, which is why we have built trust & security into our product design and network operations from day one have specific policies and community standards in place to prevent tampering investigate all reported order irregularities take prompt action against any accounts suspected of tampering with orders and work with any impacted customers to ensure a prompt resolution of any issues they report. We're also engaged in active discussions with lawmakers and other stakeholders to develop a regulatory framework for the safety of food delivery."

Related

Food This pizza shop is helping pet owners find their lost dogs and cats

An Acosta study from July 2018 showed that since 2015, "convenient meal solutions," like food delivery, have spiked in every category and age group, particularly among families with children and millennials. In 2016, research conducted by McKinsey & Company estimated that the online food delivery market will grow 4% every year for the next five years.

Encouraged by big chains, fast food fans have also been prompted to download delivery apps, since using third-party drivers to promote deals has become increasingly popular.


1 in 4 delivery drivers admit to tasting your food before delivering it

Food delivery apps are becoming increasingly popular, even in suburban areas of the U.S. But is convenience worth it if delivery drivers are sampling diners' dinners?

A recent survey, which was commissioned and conducted by restaurant food supplier and distributor US Foods, asked both consumers and delivery workers about their "habits and pain points" when it comes to ordering and delivering meals.

The responses revealed some unique insight as to how long people will actually wait to get their food, attitudes toward tipping and more. Unfortunately, it also revealed some unsettling information. For example, out of nearly 500 delivery workers surveyed, more 25% said they'd munched on food from an order. Yikes.

Apparently the temptation of a delicious meal is just too hard to resist — especially when it's not yours.

To conduct the survey, US Foods surveyed 1,518 American adults who said that they have used food delivery apps. Respondents’ ages ranged from 18-77, with a median age of 31. They also surveyed 497 American adults who "identified as having worked as a deliverer for at least one food delivery app." Those respondents had a median age of 30.

US Foods found that the average American has two food delivery apps on their smartphone, from which they order about three times a month. The most popular apps included Uber Eats, Grubhub, DoorDash and Postmates — all of which are third-party delivery services that partner with restaurants and grocery stores to bring food to peoples' homes.

Emails to Uber Eats, Grubhub and Doordash regarding the study were not immediately returned.

On Wednesday, a Postmates spokesperson provided the following statement to TODAY: "At Postmates, nothing is more important to us than the safety and wellbeing of our entire community, which is why we require each person who completes a delivery using Postmates to expressly agree that all food and goods delivered will arrive in a tamper free form and in compliance with all applicable food health and safety laws.

"While reports of food tampering represent less than 0.06% of cases reported to our Trust & Safety team, we take any report of health safety violations very seriously, which is why we have built trust & security into our product design and network operations from day one have specific policies and community standards in place to prevent tampering investigate all reported order irregularities take prompt action against any accounts suspected of tampering with orders and work with any impacted customers to ensure a prompt resolution of any issues they report. We're also engaged in active discussions with lawmakers and other stakeholders to develop a regulatory framework for the safety of food delivery."

Related

Food This pizza shop is helping pet owners find their lost dogs and cats

An Acosta study from July 2018 showed that since 2015, "convenient meal solutions," like food delivery, have spiked in every category and age group, particularly among families with children and millennials. In 2016, research conducted by McKinsey & Company estimated that the online food delivery market will grow 4% every year for the next five years.

Encouraged by big chains, fast food fans have also been prompted to download delivery apps, since using third-party drivers to promote deals has become increasingly popular.


1 in 4 delivery drivers admit to tasting your food before delivering it

Food delivery apps are becoming increasingly popular, even in suburban areas of the U.S. But is convenience worth it if delivery drivers are sampling diners' dinners?

A recent survey, which was commissioned and conducted by restaurant food supplier and distributor US Foods, asked both consumers and delivery workers about their "habits and pain points" when it comes to ordering and delivering meals.

The responses revealed some unique insight as to how long people will actually wait to get their food, attitudes toward tipping and more. Unfortunately, it also revealed some unsettling information. For example, out of nearly 500 delivery workers surveyed, more 25% said they'd munched on food from an order. Yikes.

Apparently the temptation of a delicious meal is just too hard to resist — especially when it's not yours.

To conduct the survey, US Foods surveyed 1,518 American adults who said that they have used food delivery apps. Respondents’ ages ranged from 18-77, with a median age of 31. They also surveyed 497 American adults who "identified as having worked as a deliverer for at least one food delivery app." Those respondents had a median age of 30.

US Foods found that the average American has two food delivery apps on their smartphone, from which they order about three times a month. The most popular apps included Uber Eats, Grubhub, DoorDash and Postmates — all of which are third-party delivery services that partner with restaurants and grocery stores to bring food to peoples' homes.

Emails to Uber Eats, Grubhub and Doordash regarding the study were not immediately returned.

On Wednesday, a Postmates spokesperson provided the following statement to TODAY: "At Postmates, nothing is more important to us than the safety and wellbeing of our entire community, which is why we require each person who completes a delivery using Postmates to expressly agree that all food and goods delivered will arrive in a tamper free form and in compliance with all applicable food health and safety laws.

"While reports of food tampering represent less than 0.06% of cases reported to our Trust & Safety team, we take any report of health safety violations very seriously, which is why we have built trust & security into our product design and network operations from day one have specific policies and community standards in place to prevent tampering investigate all reported order irregularities take prompt action against any accounts suspected of tampering with orders and work with any impacted customers to ensure a prompt resolution of any issues they report. We're also engaged in active discussions with lawmakers and other stakeholders to develop a regulatory framework for the safety of food delivery."

Related

Food This pizza shop is helping pet owners find their lost dogs and cats

An Acosta study from July 2018 showed that since 2015, "convenient meal solutions," like food delivery, have spiked in every category and age group, particularly among families with children and millennials. In 2016, research conducted by McKinsey & Company estimated that the online food delivery market will grow 4% every year for the next five years.

Encouraged by big chains, fast food fans have also been prompted to download delivery apps, since using third-party drivers to promote deals has become increasingly popular.


1 in 4 delivery drivers admit to tasting your food before delivering it

Food delivery apps are becoming increasingly popular, even in suburban areas of the U.S. But is convenience worth it if delivery drivers are sampling diners' dinners?

A recent survey, which was commissioned and conducted by restaurant food supplier and distributor US Foods, asked both consumers and delivery workers about their "habits and pain points" when it comes to ordering and delivering meals.

The responses revealed some unique insight as to how long people will actually wait to get their food, attitudes toward tipping and more. Unfortunately, it also revealed some unsettling information. For example, out of nearly 500 delivery workers surveyed, more 25% said they'd munched on food from an order. Yikes.

Apparently the temptation of a delicious meal is just too hard to resist — especially when it's not yours.

To conduct the survey, US Foods surveyed 1,518 American adults who said that they have used food delivery apps. Respondents’ ages ranged from 18-77, with a median age of 31. They also surveyed 497 American adults who "identified as having worked as a deliverer for at least one food delivery app." Those respondents had a median age of 30.

US Foods found that the average American has two food delivery apps on their smartphone, from which they order about three times a month. The most popular apps included Uber Eats, Grubhub, DoorDash and Postmates — all of which are third-party delivery services that partner with restaurants and grocery stores to bring food to peoples' homes.

Emails to Uber Eats, Grubhub and Doordash regarding the study were not immediately returned.

On Wednesday, a Postmates spokesperson provided the following statement to TODAY: "At Postmates, nothing is more important to us than the safety and wellbeing of our entire community, which is why we require each person who completes a delivery using Postmates to expressly agree that all food and goods delivered will arrive in a tamper free form and in compliance with all applicable food health and safety laws.

"While reports of food tampering represent less than 0.06% of cases reported to our Trust & Safety team, we take any report of health safety violations very seriously, which is why we have built trust & security into our product design and network operations from day one have specific policies and community standards in place to prevent tampering investigate all reported order irregularities take prompt action against any accounts suspected of tampering with orders and work with any impacted customers to ensure a prompt resolution of any issues they report. We're also engaged in active discussions with lawmakers and other stakeholders to develop a regulatory framework for the safety of food delivery."

Related

Food This pizza shop is helping pet owners find their lost dogs and cats

An Acosta study from July 2018 showed that since 2015, "convenient meal solutions," like food delivery, have spiked in every category and age group, particularly among families with children and millennials. In 2016, research conducted by McKinsey & Company estimated that the online food delivery market will grow 4% every year for the next five years.

Encouraged by big chains, fast food fans have also been prompted to download delivery apps, since using third-party drivers to promote deals has become increasingly popular.


1 in 4 delivery drivers admit to tasting your food before delivering it

Food delivery apps are becoming increasingly popular, even in suburban areas of the U.S. But is convenience worth it if delivery drivers are sampling diners' dinners?

A recent survey, which was commissioned and conducted by restaurant food supplier and distributor US Foods, asked both consumers and delivery workers about their "habits and pain points" when it comes to ordering and delivering meals.

The responses revealed some unique insight as to how long people will actually wait to get their food, attitudes toward tipping and more. Unfortunately, it also revealed some unsettling information. For example, out of nearly 500 delivery workers surveyed, more 25% said they'd munched on food from an order. Yikes.

Apparently the temptation of a delicious meal is just too hard to resist — especially when it's not yours.

To conduct the survey, US Foods surveyed 1,518 American adults who said that they have used food delivery apps. Respondents’ ages ranged from 18-77, with a median age of 31. They also surveyed 497 American adults who "identified as having worked as a deliverer for at least one food delivery app." Those respondents had a median age of 30.

US Foods found that the average American has two food delivery apps on their smartphone, from which they order about three times a month. The most popular apps included Uber Eats, Grubhub, DoorDash and Postmates — all of which are third-party delivery services that partner with restaurants and grocery stores to bring food to peoples' homes.

Emails to Uber Eats, Grubhub and Doordash regarding the study were not immediately returned.

On Wednesday, a Postmates spokesperson provided the following statement to TODAY: "At Postmates, nothing is more important to us than the safety and wellbeing of our entire community, which is why we require each person who completes a delivery using Postmates to expressly agree that all food and goods delivered will arrive in a tamper free form and in compliance with all applicable food health and safety laws.

"While reports of food tampering represent less than 0.06% of cases reported to our Trust & Safety team, we take any report of health safety violations very seriously, which is why we have built trust & security into our product design and network operations from day one have specific policies and community standards in place to prevent tampering investigate all reported order irregularities take prompt action against any accounts suspected of tampering with orders and work with any impacted customers to ensure a prompt resolution of any issues they report. We're also engaged in active discussions with lawmakers and other stakeholders to develop a regulatory framework for the safety of food delivery."

Related

Food This pizza shop is helping pet owners find their lost dogs and cats

An Acosta study from July 2018 showed that since 2015, "convenient meal solutions," like food delivery, have spiked in every category and age group, particularly among families with children and millennials. In 2016, research conducted by McKinsey & Company estimated that the online food delivery market will grow 4% every year for the next five years.

Encouraged by big chains, fast food fans have also been prompted to download delivery apps, since using third-party drivers to promote deals has become increasingly popular.


1 in 4 delivery drivers admit to tasting your food before delivering it

Food delivery apps are becoming increasingly popular, even in suburban areas of the U.S. But is convenience worth it if delivery drivers are sampling diners' dinners?

A recent survey, which was commissioned and conducted by restaurant food supplier and distributor US Foods, asked both consumers and delivery workers about their "habits and pain points" when it comes to ordering and delivering meals.

The responses revealed some unique insight as to how long people will actually wait to get their food, attitudes toward tipping and more. Unfortunately, it also revealed some unsettling information. For example, out of nearly 500 delivery workers surveyed, more 25% said they'd munched on food from an order. Yikes.

Apparently the temptation of a delicious meal is just too hard to resist — especially when it's not yours.

To conduct the survey, US Foods surveyed 1,518 American adults who said that they have used food delivery apps. Respondents’ ages ranged from 18-77, with a median age of 31. They also surveyed 497 American adults who "identified as having worked as a deliverer for at least one food delivery app." Those respondents had a median age of 30.

US Foods found that the average American has two food delivery apps on their smartphone, from which they order about three times a month. The most popular apps included Uber Eats, Grubhub, DoorDash and Postmates — all of which are third-party delivery services that partner with restaurants and grocery stores to bring food to peoples' homes.

Emails to Uber Eats, Grubhub and Doordash regarding the study were not immediately returned.

On Wednesday, a Postmates spokesperson provided the following statement to TODAY: "At Postmates, nothing is more important to us than the safety and wellbeing of our entire community, which is why we require each person who completes a delivery using Postmates to expressly agree that all food and goods delivered will arrive in a tamper free form and in compliance with all applicable food health and safety laws.

"While reports of food tampering represent less than 0.06% of cases reported to our Trust & Safety team, we take any report of health safety violations very seriously, which is why we have built trust & security into our product design and network operations from day one have specific policies and community standards in place to prevent tampering investigate all reported order irregularities take prompt action against any accounts suspected of tampering with orders and work with any impacted customers to ensure a prompt resolution of any issues they report. We're also engaged in active discussions with lawmakers and other stakeholders to develop a regulatory framework for the safety of food delivery."

Related

Food This pizza shop is helping pet owners find their lost dogs and cats

An Acosta study from July 2018 showed that since 2015, "convenient meal solutions," like food delivery, have spiked in every category and age group, particularly among families with children and millennials. In 2016, research conducted by McKinsey & Company estimated that the online food delivery market will grow 4% every year for the next five years.

Encouraged by big chains, fast food fans have also been prompted to download delivery apps, since using third-party drivers to promote deals has become increasingly popular.


1 in 4 delivery drivers admit to tasting your food before delivering it

Food delivery apps are becoming increasingly popular, even in suburban areas of the U.S. But is convenience worth it if delivery drivers are sampling diners' dinners?

A recent survey, which was commissioned and conducted by restaurant food supplier and distributor US Foods, asked both consumers and delivery workers about their "habits and pain points" when it comes to ordering and delivering meals.

The responses revealed some unique insight as to how long people will actually wait to get their food, attitudes toward tipping and more. Unfortunately, it also revealed some unsettling information. For example, out of nearly 500 delivery workers surveyed, more 25% said they'd munched on food from an order. Yikes.

Apparently the temptation of a delicious meal is just too hard to resist — especially when it's not yours.

To conduct the survey, US Foods surveyed 1,518 American adults who said that they have used food delivery apps. Respondents’ ages ranged from 18-77, with a median age of 31. They also surveyed 497 American adults who "identified as having worked as a deliverer for at least one food delivery app." Those respondents had a median age of 30.

US Foods found that the average American has two food delivery apps on their smartphone, from which they order about three times a month. The most popular apps included Uber Eats, Grubhub, DoorDash and Postmates — all of which are third-party delivery services that partner with restaurants and grocery stores to bring food to peoples' homes.

Emails to Uber Eats, Grubhub and Doordash regarding the study were not immediately returned.

On Wednesday, a Postmates spokesperson provided the following statement to TODAY: "At Postmates, nothing is more important to us than the safety and wellbeing of our entire community, which is why we require each person who completes a delivery using Postmates to expressly agree that all food and goods delivered will arrive in a tamper free form and in compliance with all applicable food health and safety laws.

"While reports of food tampering represent less than 0.06% of cases reported to our Trust & Safety team, we take any report of health safety violations very seriously, which is why we have built trust & security into our product design and network operations from day one have specific policies and community standards in place to prevent tampering investigate all reported order irregularities take prompt action against any accounts suspected of tampering with orders and work with any impacted customers to ensure a prompt resolution of any issues they report. We're also engaged in active discussions with lawmakers and other stakeholders to develop a regulatory framework for the safety of food delivery."

Related

Food This pizza shop is helping pet owners find their lost dogs and cats

An Acosta study from July 2018 showed that since 2015, "convenient meal solutions," like food delivery, have spiked in every category and age group, particularly among families with children and millennials. In 2016, research conducted by McKinsey & Company estimated that the online food delivery market will grow 4% every year for the next five years.

Encouraged by big chains, fast food fans have also been prompted to download delivery apps, since using third-party drivers to promote deals has become increasingly popular.


1 in 4 delivery drivers admit to tasting your food before delivering it

Food delivery apps are becoming increasingly popular, even in suburban areas of the U.S. But is convenience worth it if delivery drivers are sampling diners' dinners?

A recent survey, which was commissioned and conducted by restaurant food supplier and distributor US Foods, asked both consumers and delivery workers about their "habits and pain points" when it comes to ordering and delivering meals.

The responses revealed some unique insight as to how long people will actually wait to get their food, attitudes toward tipping and more. Unfortunately, it also revealed some unsettling information. For example, out of nearly 500 delivery workers surveyed, more 25% said they'd munched on food from an order. Yikes.

Apparently the temptation of a delicious meal is just too hard to resist — especially when it's not yours.

To conduct the survey, US Foods surveyed 1,518 American adults who said that they have used food delivery apps. Respondents’ ages ranged from 18-77, with a median age of 31. They also surveyed 497 American adults who "identified as having worked as a deliverer for at least one food delivery app." Those respondents had a median age of 30.

US Foods found that the average American has two food delivery apps on their smartphone, from which they order about three times a month. The most popular apps included Uber Eats, Grubhub, DoorDash and Postmates — all of which are third-party delivery services that partner with restaurants and grocery stores to bring food to peoples' homes.

Emails to Uber Eats, Grubhub and Doordash regarding the study were not immediately returned.

On Wednesday, a Postmates spokesperson provided the following statement to TODAY: "At Postmates, nothing is more important to us than the safety and wellbeing of our entire community, which is why we require each person who completes a delivery using Postmates to expressly agree that all food and goods delivered will arrive in a tamper free form and in compliance with all applicable food health and safety laws.

"While reports of food tampering represent less than 0.06% of cases reported to our Trust & Safety team, we take any report of health safety violations very seriously, which is why we have built trust & security into our product design and network operations from day one have specific policies and community standards in place to prevent tampering investigate all reported order irregularities take prompt action against any accounts suspected of tampering with orders and work with any impacted customers to ensure a prompt resolution of any issues they report. We're also engaged in active discussions with lawmakers and other stakeholders to develop a regulatory framework for the safety of food delivery."

Related

Food This pizza shop is helping pet owners find their lost dogs and cats

An Acosta study from July 2018 showed that since 2015, "convenient meal solutions," like food delivery, have spiked in every category and age group, particularly among families with children and millennials. In 2016, research conducted by McKinsey & Company estimated that the online food delivery market will grow 4% every year for the next five years.

Encouraged by big chains, fast food fans have also been prompted to download delivery apps, since using third-party drivers to promote deals has become increasingly popular.


1 in 4 delivery drivers admit to tasting your food before delivering it

Food delivery apps are becoming increasingly popular, even in suburban areas of the U.S. But is convenience worth it if delivery drivers are sampling diners' dinners?

A recent survey, which was commissioned and conducted by restaurant food supplier and distributor US Foods, asked both consumers and delivery workers about their "habits and pain points" when it comes to ordering and delivering meals.

The responses revealed some unique insight as to how long people will actually wait to get their food, attitudes toward tipping and more. Unfortunately, it also revealed some unsettling information. For example, out of nearly 500 delivery workers surveyed, more 25% said they'd munched on food from an order. Yikes.

Apparently the temptation of a delicious meal is just too hard to resist — especially when it's not yours.

To conduct the survey, US Foods surveyed 1,518 American adults who said that they have used food delivery apps. Respondents’ ages ranged from 18-77, with a median age of 31. They also surveyed 497 American adults who "identified as having worked as a deliverer for at least one food delivery app." Those respondents had a median age of 30.

US Foods found that the average American has two food delivery apps on their smartphone, from which they order about three times a month. The most popular apps included Uber Eats, Grubhub, DoorDash and Postmates — all of which are third-party delivery services that partner with restaurants and grocery stores to bring food to peoples' homes.

Emails to Uber Eats, Grubhub and Doordash regarding the study were not immediately returned.

On Wednesday, a Postmates spokesperson provided the following statement to TODAY: "At Postmates, nothing is more important to us than the safety and wellbeing of our entire community, which is why we require each person who completes a delivery using Postmates to expressly agree that all food and goods delivered will arrive in a tamper free form and in compliance with all applicable food health and safety laws.

"While reports of food tampering represent less than 0.06% of cases reported to our Trust & Safety team, we take any report of health safety violations very seriously, which is why we have built trust & security into our product design and network operations from day one have specific policies and community standards in place to prevent tampering investigate all reported order irregularities take prompt action against any accounts suspected of tampering with orders and work with any impacted customers to ensure a prompt resolution of any issues they report. We're also engaged in active discussions with lawmakers and other stakeholders to develop a regulatory framework for the safety of food delivery."

Related

Food This pizza shop is helping pet owners find their lost dogs and cats

An Acosta study from July 2018 showed that since 2015, "convenient meal solutions," like food delivery, have spiked in every category and age group, particularly among families with children and millennials. In 2016, research conducted by McKinsey & Company estimated that the online food delivery market will grow 4% every year for the next five years.

Encouraged by big chains, fast food fans have also been prompted to download delivery apps, since using third-party drivers to promote deals has become increasingly popular.