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Carl's Jr. Launches New Budweiser Beer Cheese Burger And Bacon Fries

Carl's Jr. Launches New Budweiser Beer Cheese Burger And Bacon Fries

Here are two cheesy new menu items that Budweiser fans will surely want to try out

The Beer Cheese Burger is topped with Budweiser beer cheese sauce.

Carl's Jr. just announced the debut of two cheesy new menu items that Budweiser fans will surely want to keep an eye out for. The fast food chain partnered with the brewing company to release a new Budweiser Beer Cheese Burger and Bacon Beer Cheese Fries.

The Beer Cheese Burger features a charbroiled, grass-fed, all-natural beef patty, Applewood-smoked bacon strips, lettuce, tomato, caramelized onions, and Swiss Cheese. It's topped with a Budweiser beer cheese sauce that combines creamy cheddar cheese and the full-flavored lager.

As an accompaniment to the burger, the Bacon Beer Cheese Fries boast that same beer cheese sauce smothered over Carl's Jr. fries and topped with bacon pieces.

You can find the items at participating Carl's Jr. and Hardee's locations nationwide. The burger, as a double, costs $7.19 and the fries $3.99. Prices for the items may vary depending on location.

Carl's Jr. also gave us an exclusive look at their new burger spot, developed by 72andSunny, set to air on Monday, Oct. 31. Check it out!

To watch the video, click here.

This article was originally published by Food Beast in October 2016.


Marketers Weigh In on Diet Craze

If there's one thing about the country's fixation with eating bacon, steak and bunless burgers, it is that this diet craze can't be ignored. So if marketers aren't merely jumping on the low-carbohydrate bandwagon -- some of them are launching counterattacks.

It isn't necessarily the purveyors of bread, potatoes, pasta and other carb-loaded fare that are leading the backlash.

Morningstar Farms, Kellogg 's brand of vegetarian foods, has been running a print ad that shows a pile of greasy bacon with a headline that reads: "Taking the low-carb thing a little too far?" The ad has run in magazines such as Meredith's Better Homes and Gardens. In a radio ad for the product, a woman is overheard ordering veal chops, ribs and a bacon cheddar burger without the bun while the voiceover, again, asks whether consumers are taking low-carb diets too far.

"There has been more and more media attention around the low-carb diet, but consumers have to also consider the fat risk to these diets," says Jenny Enochson, Kellogg's director of marketing communications.

While Kellogg is trying to position its veggie products as a healthy alternative for those on a low-carb diet, some marketers are just using the diet mania to grab some attention.


Marketers Weigh In on Diet Craze

If there's one thing about the country's fixation with eating bacon, steak and bunless burgers, it is that this diet craze can't be ignored. So if marketers aren't merely jumping on the low-carbohydrate bandwagon -- some of them are launching counterattacks.

It isn't necessarily the purveyors of bread, potatoes, pasta and other carb-loaded fare that are leading the backlash.

Morningstar Farms, Kellogg 's brand of vegetarian foods, has been running a print ad that shows a pile of greasy bacon with a headline that reads: "Taking the low-carb thing a little too far?" The ad has run in magazines such as Meredith's Better Homes and Gardens. In a radio ad for the product, a woman is overheard ordering veal chops, ribs and a bacon cheddar burger without the bun while the voiceover, again, asks whether consumers are taking low-carb diets too far.

"There has been more and more media attention around the low-carb diet, but consumers have to also consider the fat risk to these diets," says Jenny Enochson, Kellogg's director of marketing communications.

While Kellogg is trying to position its veggie products as a healthy alternative for those on a low-carb diet, some marketers are just using the diet mania to grab some attention.


Marketers Weigh In on Diet Craze

If there's one thing about the country's fixation with eating bacon, steak and bunless burgers, it is that this diet craze can't be ignored. So if marketers aren't merely jumping on the low-carbohydrate bandwagon -- some of them are launching counterattacks.

It isn't necessarily the purveyors of bread, potatoes, pasta and other carb-loaded fare that are leading the backlash.

Morningstar Farms, Kellogg 's brand of vegetarian foods, has been running a print ad that shows a pile of greasy bacon with a headline that reads: "Taking the low-carb thing a little too far?" The ad has run in magazines such as Meredith's Better Homes and Gardens. In a radio ad for the product, a woman is overheard ordering veal chops, ribs and a bacon cheddar burger without the bun while the voiceover, again, asks whether consumers are taking low-carb diets too far.

"There has been more and more media attention around the low-carb diet, but consumers have to also consider the fat risk to these diets," says Jenny Enochson, Kellogg's director of marketing communications.

While Kellogg is trying to position its veggie products as a healthy alternative for those on a low-carb diet, some marketers are just using the diet mania to grab some attention.


Marketers Weigh In on Diet Craze

If there's one thing about the country's fixation with eating bacon, steak and bunless burgers, it is that this diet craze can't be ignored. So if marketers aren't merely jumping on the low-carbohydrate bandwagon -- some of them are launching counterattacks.

It isn't necessarily the purveyors of bread, potatoes, pasta and other carb-loaded fare that are leading the backlash.

Morningstar Farms, Kellogg 's brand of vegetarian foods, has been running a print ad that shows a pile of greasy bacon with a headline that reads: "Taking the low-carb thing a little too far?" The ad has run in magazines such as Meredith's Better Homes and Gardens. In a radio ad for the product, a woman is overheard ordering veal chops, ribs and a bacon cheddar burger without the bun while the voiceover, again, asks whether consumers are taking low-carb diets too far.

"There has been more and more media attention around the low-carb diet, but consumers have to also consider the fat risk to these diets," says Jenny Enochson, Kellogg's director of marketing communications.

While Kellogg is trying to position its veggie products as a healthy alternative for those on a low-carb diet, some marketers are just using the diet mania to grab some attention.


Marketers Weigh In on Diet Craze

If there's one thing about the country's fixation with eating bacon, steak and bunless burgers, it is that this diet craze can't be ignored. So if marketers aren't merely jumping on the low-carbohydrate bandwagon -- some of them are launching counterattacks.

It isn't necessarily the purveyors of bread, potatoes, pasta and other carb-loaded fare that are leading the backlash.

Morningstar Farms, Kellogg 's brand of vegetarian foods, has been running a print ad that shows a pile of greasy bacon with a headline that reads: "Taking the low-carb thing a little too far?" The ad has run in magazines such as Meredith's Better Homes and Gardens. In a radio ad for the product, a woman is overheard ordering veal chops, ribs and a bacon cheddar burger without the bun while the voiceover, again, asks whether consumers are taking low-carb diets too far.

"There has been more and more media attention around the low-carb diet, but consumers have to also consider the fat risk to these diets," says Jenny Enochson, Kellogg's director of marketing communications.

While Kellogg is trying to position its veggie products as a healthy alternative for those on a low-carb diet, some marketers are just using the diet mania to grab some attention.


Marketers Weigh In on Diet Craze

If there's one thing about the country's fixation with eating bacon, steak and bunless burgers, it is that this diet craze can't be ignored. So if marketers aren't merely jumping on the low-carbohydrate bandwagon -- some of them are launching counterattacks.

It isn't necessarily the purveyors of bread, potatoes, pasta and other carb-loaded fare that are leading the backlash.

Morningstar Farms, Kellogg 's brand of vegetarian foods, has been running a print ad that shows a pile of greasy bacon with a headline that reads: "Taking the low-carb thing a little too far?" The ad has run in magazines such as Meredith's Better Homes and Gardens. In a radio ad for the product, a woman is overheard ordering veal chops, ribs and a bacon cheddar burger without the bun while the voiceover, again, asks whether consumers are taking low-carb diets too far.

"There has been more and more media attention around the low-carb diet, but consumers have to also consider the fat risk to these diets," says Jenny Enochson, Kellogg's director of marketing communications.

While Kellogg is trying to position its veggie products as a healthy alternative for those on a low-carb diet, some marketers are just using the diet mania to grab some attention.


Marketers Weigh In on Diet Craze

If there's one thing about the country's fixation with eating bacon, steak and bunless burgers, it is that this diet craze can't be ignored. So if marketers aren't merely jumping on the low-carbohydrate bandwagon -- some of them are launching counterattacks.

It isn't necessarily the purveyors of bread, potatoes, pasta and other carb-loaded fare that are leading the backlash.

Morningstar Farms, Kellogg 's brand of vegetarian foods, has been running a print ad that shows a pile of greasy bacon with a headline that reads: "Taking the low-carb thing a little too far?" The ad has run in magazines such as Meredith's Better Homes and Gardens. In a radio ad for the product, a woman is overheard ordering veal chops, ribs and a bacon cheddar burger without the bun while the voiceover, again, asks whether consumers are taking low-carb diets too far.

"There has been more and more media attention around the low-carb diet, but consumers have to also consider the fat risk to these diets," says Jenny Enochson, Kellogg's director of marketing communications.

While Kellogg is trying to position its veggie products as a healthy alternative for those on a low-carb diet, some marketers are just using the diet mania to grab some attention.


Marketers Weigh In on Diet Craze

If there's one thing about the country's fixation with eating bacon, steak and bunless burgers, it is that this diet craze can't be ignored. So if marketers aren't merely jumping on the low-carbohydrate bandwagon -- some of them are launching counterattacks.

It isn't necessarily the purveyors of bread, potatoes, pasta and other carb-loaded fare that are leading the backlash.

Morningstar Farms, Kellogg 's brand of vegetarian foods, has been running a print ad that shows a pile of greasy bacon with a headline that reads: "Taking the low-carb thing a little too far?" The ad has run in magazines such as Meredith's Better Homes and Gardens. In a radio ad for the product, a woman is overheard ordering veal chops, ribs and a bacon cheddar burger without the bun while the voiceover, again, asks whether consumers are taking low-carb diets too far.

"There has been more and more media attention around the low-carb diet, but consumers have to also consider the fat risk to these diets," says Jenny Enochson, Kellogg's director of marketing communications.

While Kellogg is trying to position its veggie products as a healthy alternative for those on a low-carb diet, some marketers are just using the diet mania to grab some attention.


Marketers Weigh In on Diet Craze

If there's one thing about the country's fixation with eating bacon, steak and bunless burgers, it is that this diet craze can't be ignored. So if marketers aren't merely jumping on the low-carbohydrate bandwagon -- some of them are launching counterattacks.

It isn't necessarily the purveyors of bread, potatoes, pasta and other carb-loaded fare that are leading the backlash.

Morningstar Farms, Kellogg 's brand of vegetarian foods, has been running a print ad that shows a pile of greasy bacon with a headline that reads: "Taking the low-carb thing a little too far?" The ad has run in magazines such as Meredith's Better Homes and Gardens. In a radio ad for the product, a woman is overheard ordering veal chops, ribs and a bacon cheddar burger without the bun while the voiceover, again, asks whether consumers are taking low-carb diets too far.

"There has been more and more media attention around the low-carb diet, but consumers have to also consider the fat risk to these diets," says Jenny Enochson, Kellogg's director of marketing communications.

While Kellogg is trying to position its veggie products as a healthy alternative for those on a low-carb diet, some marketers are just using the diet mania to grab some attention.


Marketers Weigh In on Diet Craze

If there's one thing about the country's fixation with eating bacon, steak and bunless burgers, it is that this diet craze can't be ignored. So if marketers aren't merely jumping on the low-carbohydrate bandwagon -- some of them are launching counterattacks.

It isn't necessarily the purveyors of bread, potatoes, pasta and other carb-loaded fare that are leading the backlash.

Morningstar Farms, Kellogg 's brand of vegetarian foods, has been running a print ad that shows a pile of greasy bacon with a headline that reads: "Taking the low-carb thing a little too far?" The ad has run in magazines such as Meredith's Better Homes and Gardens. In a radio ad for the product, a woman is overheard ordering veal chops, ribs and a bacon cheddar burger without the bun while the voiceover, again, asks whether consumers are taking low-carb diets too far.

"There has been more and more media attention around the low-carb diet, but consumers have to also consider the fat risk to these diets," says Jenny Enochson, Kellogg's director of marketing communications.

While Kellogg is trying to position its veggie products as a healthy alternative for those on a low-carb diet, some marketers are just using the diet mania to grab some attention.


Watch the video: sAs OtR: HardeesCarls Jr. Budweiser Beer Cheese Bacon Cheeseburger u0026 Fries NEW! (January 2022).