Traditional recipes

Recipe of the Day: Polish Cold Cheesecake

Recipe of the Day: Polish Cold Cheesecake

Summer is right around the corner, which means it's time for summery desserts, like a creamy, chilled cheesecake. The dessert, which is topped with strawberries and Jell-O, is the perfect way to welcome warmer weather.

Easy Dessert Recipes You Can Make With 5 Ingredients or Fewer

Perfecting this dynamic dessert's fluffy filling and crumbly bottom takes skill. But, if you think it may be too advanced, try taking one of these online cooking classes first, or check out these tips for amateur bakers.

To make the recipe you'll need cream cheese, Jell-O, vanilla wafers and a few basic groceries like powdered sugar and berries. After your ingredients are prepped and ready to go, cover the bottom of a pan with the wafers and pour the cream cheese mixture into the pan. Although the recipe takes less than an hour to prepare, it will need to set in the refrigerator for at least two hours before pouring the Jell-O and strawberries over it. Waiting will be worth it, however. This is a no-bake recipe which means your kitchen won't be steaming up while the temperatures rise outside.

Pulling off this recipe is a true testament to your baking skills, but one bite will make it all worth it. After you've mastered this cheesecase, try making more of these difficult dessert recipes that are sure to impress.

Polish Cold Cheesecake

Ingredients:

4 (8 ounce each) packages of cream cheese
2 envelopes (0.25 ounces each) of unflavored gelatin with 1 cup of hot water
1 box (3 ounces) of lemon jello with 1 cup of hot water
1/4 cup powdered sugar
Nilla wafers
Fresh strawberries, raspberries or other summer fruit
2 boxes (3 ounces each) of strawberry jello
9 inch or bigger round spring form pan

Directions:

Leave cream cheese out to come to room temperature. In the mean time, dissolve 2 envelopes of gelatin in 1 cup hot water, and lemon jello in 1 cup of hot water (that's half the water the recipe on the box calls for). Set aside to cool.
When cheese is ready, beat until fluffy, for about 2 min. Add both gelatin and jello little bit at a time. Beat until all lumps dissolve. Add sugar and beat some more until combined.
Line round pan with parchment paper, and cover the bottom with vanilla wafers. Pour cream cheese mixture into the pan. Refrigerate until set, at least 2 hours, I like to do it overnight.
Prepare strawberry jello with half the water = 1 cup of water for each box, 2 cups from two boxes. Let cool a bit. Wash and dry fresh strawberries and cut into smaller pieces. Arrange on top of set cheese mixture. Pour cool jello over strawberries and refrigerate until jello sets (about 2 hours). Serve cold.


Twaróg (Polish Farmer’s Cheese)

Twaróg, also known as ser biały, white cheese, is a pot cheese or farmer’s cheese. I made a batch this weekend because I wanted to make a Polish cheesecake.

I didn’t expect to fall in love, but I have. After one day in the fridge, the curds that I blitzed to make them creamy and smooth for my pastry had a wonderful, tart, salty taste with just a hint of sweet.

I can imagine using this cheese in so many ways, in recipes that I might have previously made with cream cheese, Brie, or ricotta.

I could serve it with a tart jam or pepper jelly on crackers. I can also imagine popping twaróg into the oven with brown sugar and pecans, serving the melted, caramely goo over little triangles of pumpernickel.

It would also be delicious mixed with finely diced or grated veggies. If you run it through a food processor, it would also be fantastic on a toasted bagel.

In case you’re wondering, this is also the cheese that you would use for my favorite, pierogi ruskie, filled with cheese and potato.

The twaróg was surprisingly easy to make, but I found that I like the taste better after it had aged in the fridge overnight, so I’ll recommend not making it at the last minute even though you could.

You can toss the liquid left behind, but many people like to save the whey for smoothies, soups, or bread making just use the whey for part of the liquid in your recipe.

The cheese I whipped up made a wonderful cheesecake, the best sernik I’ve ever tasted. There are two key differences between American and Polish cheesecake. Polish desserts are less sweet other than that, it’s all in the cheese.

Amazon sends me a few cents if you make a purchase via the links above


Twaróg (Polish Farmer’s Cheese)

Twaróg, also known as ser biały, white cheese, is a pot cheese or farmer’s cheese. I made a batch this weekend because I wanted to make a Polish cheesecake.

I didn’t expect to fall in love, but I have. After one day in the fridge, the curds that I blitzed to make them creamy and smooth for my pastry had a wonderful, tart, salty taste with just a hint of sweet.

I can imagine using this cheese in so many ways, in recipes that I might have previously made with cream cheese, Brie, or ricotta.

I could serve it with a tart jam or pepper jelly on crackers. I can also imagine popping twaróg into the oven with brown sugar and pecans, serving the melted, caramely goo over little triangles of pumpernickel.

It would also be delicious mixed with finely diced or grated veggies. If you run it through a food processor, it would also be fantastic on a toasted bagel.

In case you’re wondering, this is also the cheese that you would use for my favorite, pierogi ruskie, filled with cheese and potato.

The twaróg was surprisingly easy to make, but I found that I like the taste better after it had aged in the fridge overnight, so I’ll recommend not making it at the last minute even though you could.

You can toss the liquid left behind, but many people like to save the whey for smoothies, soups, or bread making just use the whey for part of the liquid in your recipe.

The cheese I whipped up made a wonderful cheesecake, the best sernik I’ve ever tasted. There are two key differences between American and Polish cheesecake. Polish desserts are less sweet other than that, it’s all in the cheese.

Amazon sends me a few cents if you make a purchase via the links above


Twaróg (Polish Farmer’s Cheese)

Twaróg, also known as ser biały, white cheese, is a pot cheese or farmer’s cheese. I made a batch this weekend because I wanted to make a Polish cheesecake.

I didn’t expect to fall in love, but I have. After one day in the fridge, the curds that I blitzed to make them creamy and smooth for my pastry had a wonderful, tart, salty taste with just a hint of sweet.

I can imagine using this cheese in so many ways, in recipes that I might have previously made with cream cheese, Brie, or ricotta.

I could serve it with a tart jam or pepper jelly on crackers. I can also imagine popping twaróg into the oven with brown sugar and pecans, serving the melted, caramely goo over little triangles of pumpernickel.

It would also be delicious mixed with finely diced or grated veggies. If you run it through a food processor, it would also be fantastic on a toasted bagel.

In case you’re wondering, this is also the cheese that you would use for my favorite, pierogi ruskie, filled with cheese and potato.

The twaróg was surprisingly easy to make, but I found that I like the taste better after it had aged in the fridge overnight, so I’ll recommend not making it at the last minute even though you could.

You can toss the liquid left behind, but many people like to save the whey for smoothies, soups, or bread making just use the whey for part of the liquid in your recipe.

The cheese I whipped up made a wonderful cheesecake, the best sernik I’ve ever tasted. There are two key differences between American and Polish cheesecake. Polish desserts are less sweet other than that, it’s all in the cheese.

Amazon sends me a few cents if you make a purchase via the links above


Twaróg (Polish Farmer’s Cheese)

Twaróg, also known as ser biały, white cheese, is a pot cheese or farmer’s cheese. I made a batch this weekend because I wanted to make a Polish cheesecake.

I didn’t expect to fall in love, but I have. After one day in the fridge, the curds that I blitzed to make them creamy and smooth for my pastry had a wonderful, tart, salty taste with just a hint of sweet.

I can imagine using this cheese in so many ways, in recipes that I might have previously made with cream cheese, Brie, or ricotta.

I could serve it with a tart jam or pepper jelly on crackers. I can also imagine popping twaróg into the oven with brown sugar and pecans, serving the melted, caramely goo over little triangles of pumpernickel.

It would also be delicious mixed with finely diced or grated veggies. If you run it through a food processor, it would also be fantastic on a toasted bagel.

In case you’re wondering, this is also the cheese that you would use for my favorite, pierogi ruskie, filled with cheese and potato.

The twaróg was surprisingly easy to make, but I found that I like the taste better after it had aged in the fridge overnight, so I’ll recommend not making it at the last minute even though you could.

You can toss the liquid left behind, but many people like to save the whey for smoothies, soups, or bread making just use the whey for part of the liquid in your recipe.

The cheese I whipped up made a wonderful cheesecake, the best sernik I’ve ever tasted. There are two key differences between American and Polish cheesecake. Polish desserts are less sweet other than that, it’s all in the cheese.

Amazon sends me a few cents if you make a purchase via the links above


Twaróg (Polish Farmer’s Cheese)

Twaróg, also known as ser biały, white cheese, is a pot cheese or farmer’s cheese. I made a batch this weekend because I wanted to make a Polish cheesecake.

I didn’t expect to fall in love, but I have. After one day in the fridge, the curds that I blitzed to make them creamy and smooth for my pastry had a wonderful, tart, salty taste with just a hint of sweet.

I can imagine using this cheese in so many ways, in recipes that I might have previously made with cream cheese, Brie, or ricotta.

I could serve it with a tart jam or pepper jelly on crackers. I can also imagine popping twaróg into the oven with brown sugar and pecans, serving the melted, caramely goo over little triangles of pumpernickel.

It would also be delicious mixed with finely diced or grated veggies. If you run it through a food processor, it would also be fantastic on a toasted bagel.

In case you’re wondering, this is also the cheese that you would use for my favorite, pierogi ruskie, filled with cheese and potato.

The twaróg was surprisingly easy to make, but I found that I like the taste better after it had aged in the fridge overnight, so I’ll recommend not making it at the last minute even though you could.

You can toss the liquid left behind, but many people like to save the whey for smoothies, soups, or bread making just use the whey for part of the liquid in your recipe.

The cheese I whipped up made a wonderful cheesecake, the best sernik I’ve ever tasted. There are two key differences between American and Polish cheesecake. Polish desserts are less sweet other than that, it’s all in the cheese.

Amazon sends me a few cents if you make a purchase via the links above


Twaróg (Polish Farmer’s Cheese)

Twaróg, also known as ser biały, white cheese, is a pot cheese or farmer’s cheese. I made a batch this weekend because I wanted to make a Polish cheesecake.

I didn’t expect to fall in love, but I have. After one day in the fridge, the curds that I blitzed to make them creamy and smooth for my pastry had a wonderful, tart, salty taste with just a hint of sweet.

I can imagine using this cheese in so many ways, in recipes that I might have previously made with cream cheese, Brie, or ricotta.

I could serve it with a tart jam or pepper jelly on crackers. I can also imagine popping twaróg into the oven with brown sugar and pecans, serving the melted, caramely goo over little triangles of pumpernickel.

It would also be delicious mixed with finely diced or grated veggies. If you run it through a food processor, it would also be fantastic on a toasted bagel.

In case you’re wondering, this is also the cheese that you would use for my favorite, pierogi ruskie, filled with cheese and potato.

The twaróg was surprisingly easy to make, but I found that I like the taste better after it had aged in the fridge overnight, so I’ll recommend not making it at the last minute even though you could.

You can toss the liquid left behind, but many people like to save the whey for smoothies, soups, or bread making just use the whey for part of the liquid in your recipe.

The cheese I whipped up made a wonderful cheesecake, the best sernik I’ve ever tasted. There are two key differences between American and Polish cheesecake. Polish desserts are less sweet other than that, it’s all in the cheese.

Amazon sends me a few cents if you make a purchase via the links above


Twaróg (Polish Farmer’s Cheese)

Twaróg, also known as ser biały, white cheese, is a pot cheese or farmer’s cheese. I made a batch this weekend because I wanted to make a Polish cheesecake.

I didn’t expect to fall in love, but I have. After one day in the fridge, the curds that I blitzed to make them creamy and smooth for my pastry had a wonderful, tart, salty taste with just a hint of sweet.

I can imagine using this cheese in so many ways, in recipes that I might have previously made with cream cheese, Brie, or ricotta.

I could serve it with a tart jam or pepper jelly on crackers. I can also imagine popping twaróg into the oven with brown sugar and pecans, serving the melted, caramely goo over little triangles of pumpernickel.

It would also be delicious mixed with finely diced or grated veggies. If you run it through a food processor, it would also be fantastic on a toasted bagel.

In case you’re wondering, this is also the cheese that you would use for my favorite, pierogi ruskie, filled with cheese and potato.

The twaróg was surprisingly easy to make, but I found that I like the taste better after it had aged in the fridge overnight, so I’ll recommend not making it at the last minute even though you could.

You can toss the liquid left behind, but many people like to save the whey for smoothies, soups, or bread making just use the whey for part of the liquid in your recipe.

The cheese I whipped up made a wonderful cheesecake, the best sernik I’ve ever tasted. There are two key differences between American and Polish cheesecake. Polish desserts are less sweet other than that, it’s all in the cheese.

Amazon sends me a few cents if you make a purchase via the links above


Twaróg (Polish Farmer’s Cheese)

Twaróg, also known as ser biały, white cheese, is a pot cheese or farmer’s cheese. I made a batch this weekend because I wanted to make a Polish cheesecake.

I didn’t expect to fall in love, but I have. After one day in the fridge, the curds that I blitzed to make them creamy and smooth for my pastry had a wonderful, tart, salty taste with just a hint of sweet.

I can imagine using this cheese in so many ways, in recipes that I might have previously made with cream cheese, Brie, or ricotta.

I could serve it with a tart jam or pepper jelly on crackers. I can also imagine popping twaróg into the oven with brown sugar and pecans, serving the melted, caramely goo over little triangles of pumpernickel.

It would also be delicious mixed with finely diced or grated veggies. If you run it through a food processor, it would also be fantastic on a toasted bagel.

In case you’re wondering, this is also the cheese that you would use for my favorite, pierogi ruskie, filled with cheese and potato.

The twaróg was surprisingly easy to make, but I found that I like the taste better after it had aged in the fridge overnight, so I’ll recommend not making it at the last minute even though you could.

You can toss the liquid left behind, but many people like to save the whey for smoothies, soups, or bread making just use the whey for part of the liquid in your recipe.

The cheese I whipped up made a wonderful cheesecake, the best sernik I’ve ever tasted. There are two key differences between American and Polish cheesecake. Polish desserts are less sweet other than that, it’s all in the cheese.

Amazon sends me a few cents if you make a purchase via the links above


Twaróg (Polish Farmer’s Cheese)

Twaróg, also known as ser biały, white cheese, is a pot cheese or farmer’s cheese. I made a batch this weekend because I wanted to make a Polish cheesecake.

I didn’t expect to fall in love, but I have. After one day in the fridge, the curds that I blitzed to make them creamy and smooth for my pastry had a wonderful, tart, salty taste with just a hint of sweet.

I can imagine using this cheese in so many ways, in recipes that I might have previously made with cream cheese, Brie, or ricotta.

I could serve it with a tart jam or pepper jelly on crackers. I can also imagine popping twaróg into the oven with brown sugar and pecans, serving the melted, caramely goo over little triangles of pumpernickel.

It would also be delicious mixed with finely diced or grated veggies. If you run it through a food processor, it would also be fantastic on a toasted bagel.

In case you’re wondering, this is also the cheese that you would use for my favorite, pierogi ruskie, filled with cheese and potato.

The twaróg was surprisingly easy to make, but I found that I like the taste better after it had aged in the fridge overnight, so I’ll recommend not making it at the last minute even though you could.

You can toss the liquid left behind, but many people like to save the whey for smoothies, soups, or bread making just use the whey for part of the liquid in your recipe.

The cheese I whipped up made a wonderful cheesecake, the best sernik I’ve ever tasted. There are two key differences between American and Polish cheesecake. Polish desserts are less sweet other than that, it’s all in the cheese.

Amazon sends me a few cents if you make a purchase via the links above


Twaróg (Polish Farmer’s Cheese)

Twaróg, also known as ser biały, white cheese, is a pot cheese or farmer’s cheese. I made a batch this weekend because I wanted to make a Polish cheesecake.

I didn’t expect to fall in love, but I have. After one day in the fridge, the curds that I blitzed to make them creamy and smooth for my pastry had a wonderful, tart, salty taste with just a hint of sweet.

I can imagine using this cheese in so many ways, in recipes that I might have previously made with cream cheese, Brie, or ricotta.

I could serve it with a tart jam or pepper jelly on crackers. I can also imagine popping twaróg into the oven with brown sugar and pecans, serving the melted, caramely goo over little triangles of pumpernickel.

It would also be delicious mixed with finely diced or grated veggies. If you run it through a food processor, it would also be fantastic on a toasted bagel.

In case you’re wondering, this is also the cheese that you would use for my favorite, pierogi ruskie, filled with cheese and potato.

The twaróg was surprisingly easy to make, but I found that I like the taste better after it had aged in the fridge overnight, so I’ll recommend not making it at the last minute even though you could.

You can toss the liquid left behind, but many people like to save the whey for smoothies, soups, or bread making just use the whey for part of the liquid in your recipe.

The cheese I whipped up made a wonderful cheesecake, the best sernik I’ve ever tasted. There are two key differences between American and Polish cheesecake. Polish desserts are less sweet other than that, it’s all in the cheese.

Amazon sends me a few cents if you make a purchase via the links above