Traditional recipes

Lancashire Lamb Hotpot recipe

Lancashire Lamb Hotpot recipe

A slow cooked hot-pot, which will give you those crispy sliced potatoes on top, and delicious, melt in your mouth lamb underneath. Absolutely superb, serve it with anything, maybe even just have two at a time.


Shropshire, England, UK

15 people made this

Ingredients

  • 2 tablespoons olive oil
  • 1KG of diced lean lamb
  • 4 medium onions, peeled and sliced
  • 1.5 tbs flour
  • 800ml of lamb stock
  • generous pinch of dried thyme
  • 2 bay leaves
  • 3 tsps Worcester sauce
  • 50g of pearl barley
  • 900g of potatoes, peeled and sliced
  • 30g butter, in small squares

Method

  1. Preheat your oven to Gas mark 3/160C/140C fan.
  2. Heat 1 tbs of olive oil in large frying pan (or wok) and brown the lamb in batches over a high heat. When browned, remove from the pan and place in a large casserole dish.
  3. Add the remaining 1tbs of olive oil to the pan and fry the onions over a gentle heat until they are soft and then add the flour.
  4. Pour in the stock and Worcester sauce and then continue stirring until boiling.
  5. Season with salt and pepper to taste and then pour over the lamb.
  6. Add the bay leaves, thyme and pearl barley and stir well.
  7. Arrange the potato slices on top of the ingredients and dot knobs of butter on top of them.
  8. Place a tight fitting lid on the casserole dish and cook in the oven for at least two hours. Remove the lid and cook for a further 45 minutes, until the potatoes are cooked, brown and crisp. (you may want to turn your oven up to do this)

Tip

You could always cook this in a slow cooker (or a Slow setting on your oven).Best to oven cook if you want your potatoes crispy on top though!

See it on my blog

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  • 6 lamb chops, weighing approximately 500g/1lb 2oz in total
  • 3 tbsp olive oil
  • 1 large carrot, roughly chopped
  • 1 celery stalk, trimmed, roughly chopped
  • 1 large onion, roughly chopped
  • 2 tbsp plain flour
  • 1 litre/1¾ pints beef stock
  • 8 sprigs fresh thyme
  • 1 bay leaf
  • 100g/3½oz butter, melted
  • 2 large floury potatoes, such as Maris Piper, sliced into 1cm/½in-thick discs
  • salt and freshly ground black pepper

Preheat the oven to 170C/150C Fan/Gas 3.

Season the lamb chops with plenty of salt and freshly ground black pepper. Heat the oil in a frying pan over a medium heat, then fry the lamb chops for 2-3 minutes on each side, or until browned all over. Transfer the lamb chops to a medium casserole.

Fry the carrot, celery and onion in the same frying pan for 4-5 minutes, or until coloured and softened.

Stir the flour into the vegetables and continue to fry for 2-3 minutes, or until the flour turns a biscuit colour.

Pour in the beef stock and stir well until the liquid has thickened and there are no visible lumps of flour.

Transfer the vegetables and thickened stock to the casserole. Add 7 thyme sprigs and the bay leaf, then bring the mixture to the boil. Reduce the heat until the mixture is just simmering.

Melt the butter in a small saucepan over a medium heat.

Arrange the potato slices on top of the hotpot, overlapping the edges slightly. Brush the potato slices all over with the melted butter. Sprinkle the top with a few thyme leaves from the remaining sprig of thyme.

Bake the hotpot in the oven for 1-1½ hours, or until the potato topping is crisp and golden-brown and the vegetables are tender.


Old Fashioned Lancashire Hotpot

Old Fashioned Lancashire Hot Pot is the quintessential meat and potatoes dish. Tender pieces of lamb, vegetables and sliced potatoes braised in the oven. One pot comfort food for the whole family. This popular pub grub is traditionally baked in a heavy cast iron or enamel pan with a lid. A hearty and comforting one-pot meal that consists of lamb, sliced onions, carrots all cooked in a well-seasoned beef stock, topped with thinly sliced potatoes.

For this dish I like lamb leg. This is for two reasons, it&rsquos easy to find and it can stand up to the long cooking time that results in tender meat.

In the days of its inception, around the mid 1800&rsquos, mutton was typically used. This has now evolved into lamb because, well, when was the last time you saw mutton in the grocery store?

This historical dish is a typical hearty meat and potatoes dish that would feed millworkers, miners and such after a long day of work.

Not to be confused with the Chinese hot pot, which is a method of cooking by simmering a pot of soup at the table. The hotpot in this case refers to the vessel in which it is cooked, long, low and slow.

I like to use my braising pan which has a lid. It measures 11-inches (28 cm) in diameter, is 4-inches (10 cm) high and oven-proof.

Old Fashioned Lancashire Hotpot is best slowly roasted for about 1 1/2 hours, this gives a chance for all the flavors to meld and develop.

Serving Suggestion

It is almost a sacrilege by English standards to serve lamb without mint sauce so I always like to make my quick mint sauce to serve alongside. The recipe is courtesy of my mum.

More British Recipes:

If you&rsquove made this Old Fashioned Lancashire Hotpot or any other recipe leave a comment below. I love to hear from my readers!


Easy Lamb Hotpot

So this week is #LoveLambWeek – a week which highlights what a delicious and versatile meat lamb is and encourages us all to eat it a bit more often to support our farmers and this brilliantly sustainable industry. You can find out more by following #LoveLambWeek on social media and if you cook up a lovely lamb recipe this week, do share it on social media with the #LoveLambWeek hashtag – if you copy me in on Twitter (I’m @easypeasyfoodie) I’ll most definitely retweet it!

As you know I am hugely passionate about lamb and just love cooking easy peasy meals with this fab meat. I have been working all year with the folk at the ‘LAMB. Tasty Easy Fun’ campaign and when they challenged me to make a lamb dish for Love Lamb Week using just 5 ingredients – I knew just what to make!

Recently Jamie Oliver has been championing his latest book “5 Ingredients” (so my kind of book!) and in it he shares his recipe for 5 ingredient Lamb Hotpot – and well it reminded me that I just so happen to have my own recipe for a 5 ingredient lamb hotpot….though admittedly mine is totally different from Jamie’s recipe – as mine is as traditional as they come…

Handed down from my Lancashire great grandma (who sadly I never got to meet), to my grandma and then to my mum and finally to me, this is a pretty authentic Lancashire hotpot recipe – my Lancashire forebears would certainly not have been putting umami paste in their hotpot (as Jamie does), but I can guarantee this hotpot is still fabulously tasty – the meltingly tender lamb and crispy, lamb flavoured potatoes are too die for!

In fact my Lancashire lamb hotpot comes with a lovely story attached: apparently in days gone by, the various members of the family might come home at different times…the hotpot would go into the oven in the morning and then, as the family returned for their dinner, they would help themselves to some hotpot, add a bit more water and return it to the oven to cook on a low heat until the next person came in – what a genius way to solve the problem of different family members eating at different times!

The 5 ingredients in this Easy Lamb Hotpot are simply onions, carrots, lamb, lamb stock and potatoes – all good traditional British ingredients, which when put together produces the most fabulous dish (well OK plus a little oil, salt and pepper, but they don’t really count do they?). If you want to get a bit more fancy (and I often do), you can also add in some swede and some herbs (bay and thyme work really well) – but this is strictly optional.

The trick to making a good lamb hotpot is to ensure the lamb and potatoes are cooked to perfection – the lamb needs a good slow cook to get it really tender and to ensure the potatoes are cooked through properly I cover the dish with a lid to begin with (the steam helps the potatoes cook), and then for the last half an hour, I turn up the oven and uncover the potatoes to ensure they are super brown and crispy on top.

I prefer to use a wide, shallow dish to make my hotpot – this means you get a really good ratio of potato to lamb and the top gets really crispy. However if you want to double the quantities below, and therefore need a deeper pan, I suggest you put a layer of potatoes halfway up as well as on top – this ensures everyone gets a good amount of potatoes, but the layer on top cooks well and isn’t too thick.

And just a quick note on cutting the potatoes – there is absolutely no need for a mandolin or food processor to cut these potatoes finely (another thing my ancestors wouldn’t have had!) – in fact, if you follow the recipe below, you really don’t need to cut them all that finely – I find a thickness of roughly 3mm to be about right, but it doesn’t need to be perfect – quite a few of mine ended up thicker or thinner in the one I made for the photos and all the potatoes were cooked just perfectly!

To make this hotpot super duper easy, I’ve adapted the recipe so you can make this all in one pot. So long as you have a wide, shallow casserole that can go on the hob (I have a lovely cast iron pot which is just perfect for this kind of thing), or a similar shaped saucepan that can go in the oven, you can cook everything in the same pot – start it off on the hob and then pop it straight into the oven. If you don’t have a suitable cast iron pot/oven proof saucepan, then simply start this in a saucepan or frying pan on the hob and then transfer to an ovenproof dish for the oven part.


Traditional Lancashire Hotpot

In the traditional Lancashire hotpot, the cut of mutton used was the scrag (the part taken from the neck) or lamb kidneys that are usually cooked in a heavy pot, slowly for hours. The benefit of slow cooking is that the aroma or flavor of the lamb or mutton is infused into the stew the heat also makes the lamb very soft.

Oysters were used in the traditional lamb hotpot but they are used less in the modern Lancashire hotpot recipes because oysters are now expensive.


Recipe Summary

  • 1 tablespoon vegetable oil
  • 12 ounces chopped onion
  • 1 ½ pounds cubed leg of lamb meat
  • 2 ½ pounds potatoes, peeled and thinly sliced
  • 2 tablespoons chopped fresh thyme
  • 1 ounce butter
  • 2 cups chicken or lamb stock

Heat oil in a large skillet over medium high heat. Saute onion until soft and deep golden in color. Remove from skillet and set aside. Add lamb to skillet and fry (in batches if necessary) until rich chestnut brown in color, 12 to 15 minutes. Drain fat and reserve.

Preheat oven to 375 degrees F (190 degrees C).

Spread 1/2 of the potatoes in the bottom of a 9x13 inch baking dish. Season with salt and pepper to taste. Place browned lamb and onions on top, then sprinkle with thyme and season to taste. Cover with remaining potatoes, season to taste and dot with butter. Pour stock over all.

Bake in the preheated oven for 1 1/2 to 2 hours. Note: If casserole is drying out while cooking, add more stock as needed. If casserole is browning too quickly, cover with aluminum foil.


Lancashire hotpot

Heat half the oil in a large frying pan and brown the lamb in batches over a high heat. Remove and place in a large shallow casserole dish. Add the kidneys to the pan, quickly brown them, then add to the lamb.

Heat the remaining oil in the pan, then fry the onions over a low heat for 10 minutes, until golden brown. Stir in the flour, then add the stock and Worcestershire sauce, and bring to the boil, stirring. Season to taste with salt and freshly ground black pepper. Add the bay leaf and thyme, then pour into the casserole dish over the lamb.

Arrange the potato slices on top of the meat and brush with the melted butter. Cover with a tight-fitting lid and cook in the oven for 1 1&frasl2 hours. Remove the lid and cook for a further 35 minutes, until the potatoes are golden and crisp. Great with steamed green vegetables.


Lancashire Hotpot

Preheat your oven to 170 C/ 150 C fan.

Heat lard, dripping or butter in a saute pan and brown the lamb, in batches. Remove from the pan.

Core and finely chop the lamb's kidneys and brown all over. Set aside.

Add the onions to the pan (you might need to add a little more fat) and cook for a few minutes until they begin to soften.

Add the sliced carrots and cook for another few minutes.

Sprinkle over the plain flour, stir to combine and cook for another minute.

Return the lamb and kidneys to the pan.

Add the stock and Worcestershire sauce and bring to a simmer.

Add the thyme and bay leaves, pop the lid on and allow to simmer while you prepare the potatoes.

Wash and thinly slice your Albert Bartlett rooster potatoes into 2-3mm thickness. Leave them unpeeled if you wish.

Grease a large, lidded casserole dish and arrange a layer of potatoes on the bottom and sides. Season well with salt and pepper.

Spoon in the lamb mixture.

Arrange another layer of thinly sliced Albert Bartlett rooster potatoes over the top of the lamb mixture, making sure the potato slices overlap slightly in a thatched effect.

Brush with a little melted lard, dripping or butter and season well.

Bake in the centre of the oven for one hour, with the lid on.

After one hour, turn the heat up to 200 C/ 180 C fan, remove the lid and bake for a further 30 minutes to allow the top layer of potatoes to crisp up.

Don’t worry if you don’t have these exact ingredients in the house, this recipe works well with any root veg and any meat.

To freeze, simply follow this recipe to the end of step 15, where it’s been baked in the oven for an hour with the lid on. Remove from the oven, cool and freeze.

This recipe was created for Albert Bartlett by Award Winning Food Blogger, Elizabeth’s Kitchen Diaries.

What you will need

Preparation: 20 mins

Cooking: 90 mins

30g lard dripping or butter
900g lamb shoulder cubed
3 lamb's kidneys (optional)
4 brown onions
4 carrots
25g plain flour
500ml lamb stock
1 tbsp Worcestershire sauce
1 tbsp fresh thyme leaves only
2 bay leaves
1.5 kg Albert Bartlett potatoes
sea salt to taste
freshly ground black pepper to taste


Lancashire Lamb Hotpot recipe - Recipes

Heat the oil in a large casserole pan over a medium heat and fry the lamb leg in batches, until browned all over.

Season each batch as you cook them and set aside on a plate once cooked until all the lamb is done.

Add the onions to the same pan, season again and cook, stirring every now and then, for 5 minutes until starting to soften.

Pop the lamb back into the pan and add the kidneys. Pour the stock into the pan with the sprigs of rosemary, if using. Season well and stir.

Cover the pan with a lid, bring to the boil then turn the heat down and simmer on a low heat, very gently, for 2 hours until the lamb is tender.

To check, pull a piece apart with two forks – it should shred easily.

Uncover the pan and spread the sliced potatoes all over the top to cover. Sprinkle over the Worcestershire sauce. Dot with butter then season and cook in the oven for 45 minutes at 180°C.

Heat the oil in a large casserole pan over a medium heat and fry the lamb leg in batches, until browned all over.

Season each batch as you cook them and set aside on a plate once cooked until all the lamb is done.

Add the onions to the same pan, season again and cook, stirring every now and then, for 5 minutes until starting to soften.

Pop the lamb back into the pan and add the kidneys. Pour the stock into the pan with the sprigs of rosemary, if using. Season well and stir.

Cover the pan with a lid, bring to the boil then turn the heat down and simmer on a low heat, very gently, for 2 hours until the lamb is tender.

To check, pull a piece apart with two forks – it should shred easily.

Uncover the pan and spread the sliced potatoes all over the top to cover. Sprinkle over the Worcestershire sauce. Dot with butter then season and cook in the oven for 45 minutes at 180°C.


Ingredients

We've prepared a simple shopping list so you can easily get all you need to make this hearty dinner. Be sure to note down the ingredients or take a screenshot before heading to the shops.

875g lamb neck fillet, steaks or stewing steaks, cut into 5-6cm pieces, excess fat trimmed
1½ tbsp rapeseed or olive oil
15g butter, plus extra for greasing
2 large onions, halved lengthways, thinly sliced
2 medium carrots, sliced
3 thyme sprigs, plus extra thyme leaves to garnish
750g King Edward or Maris Piper potatoes, thinly sliced
125g chestnut mushrooms, quartered or halved if small
200ml chicken or lamb stock