Traditional recipes

Radicchio Salad with Beans, Figs, and Walnuts

Radicchio Salad with Beans, Figs, and Walnuts

1 Servings

January 2015

Ingredients

  • 1 cup leftover beans from Bean and Walnut Salad with Fried Eggs (click here for recipe)

  • 3 cups chopped radicchio

  • 2 dried Turkish figs, sliced

  • 2 tablespoons Whole Grain Mustard Walnut Vinaigrette (click here for recipe)

Recipe Preparation

  • Toss beans, radicchio, and figs with vinaigrette.

Recipe by Sara Dickerman

,

Photos by Danny Kim

Nutritional Content

Calories (kcal) 480 Fat (g) 27 Saturated Fat (g) 3 Cholesterol (mg) 0 Carbohydrates (g) 51 Dietary Fiber (g) 3 Total Sugars (g) 11 Protein (g) 14 Sodium (mg) 170

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Green Beans With Figs and Walnuts

Green beans are like the perfect little black dress: appropriate for so many occasions. Dressed with a bit of butter, they are a welcome, simple companion to roasts, steaks, fried chicken, even scrambled eggs. Toss in a few nuts or flavored oils and they are ready for company. With nuts, figs and herbs, they'll be the hit of any dinner party.

Try this recipe with different herbs and nuts, but definitely keep the figs. The dried fruit can be used, but rehydrate them with a liquid -– wine, apple juice, water, etc. -- before adding them to the recipe.

Servings: 6
Ingredients
Directions

Fill a large saucepan three-quarters full with water and bring to a boil over high heat. Carefully add the green beans once the water returns to a boil, cook for 4 minutes. Drain and rinse with cold water until the beans are cool to the touch.

Add the oil to the saucepan and return to the stove over medium heat. When it is hot, add the onion and cook for about 5 minutes, stirring occasionally, until the onion starts to soften. Reduce the heat to medium-low and add the rosemary, honey, mustard, lemon zest and vinegar mix well to form a glaze.

Add the cooled green beans and stir to coat evenly, then add the figs. Season with salt and pepper to taste. Cook for about 3 minutes, until the beans are warmed through and the flavors have had a chance to mingle. If the glaze begins to thicken and stick to the bottom of the saucepan, add water a tablespoon at a time to achieve the desired consistency.

Remove from the heat. Toss in the walnuts and serve warm, or at room temperature.

NOTE: Toast walnuts in a dry skillet over medium-low heat for 4 to 6 minutes or until fragrant, shaking them occasionally to keep them from burning.


Fall Pear & Fig Salad

If you have been following my recent recipe postings, you’ll probably realize that I have just experienced our yearly fig explosion and though it is a short season, when the figs ripen, they do so quickly and all at once. So……I canned fig jam and fig and apple tart filling to use next year, I made fig tarts, fig cake, fig bread, fig pizza, and LOTS of fig salads. The great thing about a fresh fig, is that there is little work to prepare it before eating. Simply trim off the stem, slice open and enjoy!

In this quick and easy salad, I paired figs with ripe pairs, baby greens, and slivered almonds that were lightly toasted. I dressed the salad in a light lemon and honey vinaigrette that I added just a little Dijon mustard to in order to give it a little vibrancy. If you wanted to embellish this salad further, either goat cheese or blue cheese crumbles would be tasty, as would some crispy pancetta or prosciutto bits. When using fresh fruit such as pears or apples in a salad, it is best to dip them in a little lemon water so they do not discolor when sliced. Since baby greens are so delicate, rather than dressing them first as I do most salads, I simply arrange the salad attractively on my plates and then drizzle the dressing on just before serving so the greens do not wilt. To toast the almonds, simply place them on a baking sheet in an oven preheat to 350 degrees until lightly browned.


Radicchio Salad with Beans, Figs, and Walnuts - Recipes

A spoonful of jam in the dressing guarantees an arugula salad that is lively but not harsh.

Arugula Salad with Figs, Prosciutto, Walnuts, and Parmesan
SERVES 6 FAST
WHY THIS RECIPE WORKS Arugula has a lively, spicy bite, and so for a salad, it’s important to choose accompaniments that can stand up to its assertive character. We found that the sweet and salty notes of figs and prosciutto, both popular in Italian cuisine, paired well with peppery arugula, so we began by frying up thin slices of prosciutto to heighten its flavor and give it some crunch. Dried figs were easier to come by than their fresh counterparts, and chopping them into small pieces ensured that we got bites of fig throughout the salad. A basic vinaigrette, made with mustard and balsamic, was too spicy with the already punchy arugula. A surprise substitution—a spoonful of jam in place of the mustard—added fruity sweetness, pulling the flavors of the salad right in line. Microwaving the vinegar, jam, minced shallot, and chopped figs allowed the fruit to plump and the flavors to meld before we whisked in the olive oil. Toasted walnuts, sprinkled over the dressed arugula, gave the salad an earthy crunch, and Parmesan complemented the walnuts while also reinforcing the prosciutto’s salty flavor. Although frying the prosciutto adds crisp texture to the salad, you can simply cut it into ribbons and use it as a garnish. Honey can be substituted for the raspberry jam.

¼ cup extra-virgin olive oil
2 ounces thinly sliced prosciutto, cut into ¼-inch-wide ribbons
3 tablespoons balsamic vinegar
1 tablespoon raspberry jam
1 small shallot, minced
Salt and pepper
½ cup dried figs, stemmed and chopped
8 ounces (8 cups) baby arugula
½ cup walnuts, toasted and chopped

2 ounces Parmesan cheese, shaved
1. Heat 1 tablespoon oil in 10-inch nonstick skillet over medium heat. Add prosciutto and cook, stirring often, until crisp, about 7 minutes. Using slotted spoon, transfer prosciutto to paper towel–lined plate set aside.
2. Whisk vinegar, jam, shallot, ¼ teaspoon salt, and ⅛ teaspoon pepper together in large bowl. Stir in figs, cover, and microwave until steaming, about 1 minute. Whisking constantly, slowly drizzle in remaining 3 tablespoons oil. Let sit until figs are softened and vinaigrette has cooled to room temperature, about 15 minutes.
3. Just before serving, whisk vinaigrette to re-emulsify. Add arugula and gently toss to coat. Season with salt and pepper to taste. Serve, topping individual portions with prosciutto, walnuts, and Parmesan.

VARIATION
Arugula Salad with Pear, Almonds, Goat Cheese, and Apricots
SERVES 6 FAST VEG
Honey can be substituted for the apricot jam.
3 tablespoons white wine vinegar
1 tablespoon apricot jam
1 small shallot, minced
Salt and pepper
½ cup dried apricots, chopped
3 tablespoons extra-virgin olive oil
¼ small red onion, sliced thin
8 ounces (8 cups) baby arugula
1 ripe but firm pear, halved, cored, and sliced ¼ inch thick
⅓ cup sliced almonds, toasted

3 ounces goat cheese, crumbled (¾ cup)
1. Whisk vinegar, jam, shallot, ¼ teaspoon salt, and ⅛ teaspoon pepper together in large bowl. Add apricots, cover, and microwave until steaming, about 1 minute. Whisking constantly, slowly drizzle in oil. Stir in onion and let sit until figs are softened and vinaigrette has cooled to room temperature, about 15 minutes.
2. Just before serving, whisk vinaigrette to re-emulsify. Add arugula and pear and gently toss to coat. Season with salt and pepper to taste. Serve, topping individual portions with almonds and goat cheese.

Asparagus and Arugula Salad with Cannellini Beans
Serves 4 to 6 FAST VEG
WHY THIS RECIPE WORKS Asparagus has been a favorite vegetable in the Mediterranean since the Greeks and Romans. To incorporate it into a bright, fresh salad, choosing the right cooking method was key. Steaming produced bland, mushy spears, but sautéing the asparagus over high heat delivered deep flavor and tender texture. We sliced the spears on a bias to expose as much of the inner fibers to the cooking surface as possible. With olive oil in a hot pan, we browned some red onion before adding the asparagus pieces. Just 4 minutes of cooking was enough to produce uniformly tender pieces. Creamy cannellini beans provided a subtly nutty and smooth contrast to the asparagus. While the asparagus mixture cooled, we made a simple vinaigrette of balsamic, olive oil, salt, and pepper. For the greens, we knew peppery arugula would hold up well against the other bold flavors, so we dressed and plated it before tossing the asparagus in the dressing as well. Look for asparagus spears no thicker than ½ inch.

5 tablespoons extra-virgin olive oil
½ red onion, sliced thin
1 pound asparagus, trimmed and cut on bias into 1-inch lengths
Salt and pepper
1 (15-ounce) can cannellini beans, rinsed
2 tablespoons plus 2 teaspoons balsamic vinegar
6 ounces (6 cups) baby arugula

1. Heat 2 tablespoons oil in 12-inch nonstick skillet over high heat until just smoking. Add onion and cook until lightly browned, about 1 minute. Add asparagus, ¼ teaspoon salt, and ¼ teaspoon pepper and cook, stirring occasionally, until asparagus is browned and crisp-tender, about 4 minutes. Transfer to bowl, stir in beans, and let cool slightly.
2. Whisk vinegar, ¼ teaspoon salt, and ⅛ teaspoon pepper together in small bowl. Whisking constantly, slowly drizzle in remaining 3 tablespoons oil. Gently toss arugula with 2 tablespoons dressing until coated. Season with salt and pepper to taste. Divide arugula among plates. Toss asparagus mixture with remaining dressing, arrange over arugula, and serve.

VARIATION
Asparagus, Red Pepper, and Spinach Salad with Goat Cheese
Serves 4 to 6 FAST VEG
Look for asparagus spears no thicker than ½ inch.
5 tablespoons extra-virgin olive oil
1 red bell pepper, stemmed, seeded, and cut into 2-inch-long matchsticks
1 pound asparagus, trimmed and cut on bias into 1-inch lengths
Salt and pepper
1 shallot, halved and sliced thin
1 tablespoon plus 1 teaspoon sherry vinegar
1 garlic clove, minced
6 ounces (6 cups) baby spinach
2 ounces goat cheese, crumbled (½ cup)

1. Heat 1 tablespoon oil in 12-inch nonstick skillet over high heat until just smoking. Add bell pepper and cook until lightly browned, about 2 minutes. Add asparagus, ¼ teaspoon salt, and ⅛ teaspoon pepper and cook, stirring occasionally, until asparagus is browned and almost tender, about 2 minutes. Stir in shallot and cook until softened and asparagus is crisp-tender, about 1 minute. Transfer to bowl and let cool slightly.
2. Whisk vinegar, garlic, ¼ teaspoon salt, and ⅛ teaspoon pepper together in small bowl. Whisking constantly, slowly drizzle in remaining ¼ cup oil. Gently toss spinach with 2 tablespoons dressing until coated. Season with salt and pepper to taste. Divide spinach among plates. Toss asparagus mixture with remaining dressing and arrange over spinach. Sprinkle with goat cheese and serve.

NOTES FROM THE TEST KITCHEN
How to Dress a Salad
Getting a properly dressed salad requires a few simple steps. You never want to dump a set amount of dressing over greens and assume they will be perfectly coated. Once you have overdressed your salad, there is no going back, so it’s best to lightly drizzle and toss the salad with tongs a couple of times, tasting as you go. Generally, ¼ cup of vinaigrette dresses 8 to 10 cups of lightly packed greens, enough for four to six side salads or two to three dinner salads. For the freshest salad, make sure to dress your greens just before serving. Also, for just a hint of garlic flavor, rub the inside of the salad bowl with half a clove of peeled garlic before adding the lettuce.


Place the pears in a shallow bowl and combine them with the lemon juice. Cover and set aside.

Whisk the dressing ingredients together in a small bowl and set aside.

Combine the radicchio, walnuts, cranberries, and orange segments in a bowl. Pour the dressing over the top and toss well. Add the pears with the lemon juice and toss again.

Sprinkle the top with the cheese and serve.

Variation: Dried figs, chopped, instead of cranberries make a nice alternative.

This recipe is from CIAO ITALIA PRONTO! by Mary Ann Esposito, published by St. Martin's Press in 2005.


14 salad with kale and walnuts Recipes

Kale Waldorf Salad With Apples, Walnuts & Creamy Dressing

Kale Waldorf Salad With Apples, Walnuts & Creamy Dressing

Raw Kale Salad With Gouda, Pear, and Walnuts

Raw Kale Salad With Gouda, Pear, and Walnuts

Marinated Kale Salad With Infused Balsamic Golden Raisins &

Marinated Kale Salad With Infused Balsamic Golden Raisins &

Lacinato Kale Salad With Dried Cranberries and Walnuts

Lacinato Kale Salad With Dried Cranberries and Walnuts

Emerald City Salad

Emerald City Salad

Autumn Wrapsody (Food Network Kitchens)

40 Healthy Salad Recipes You'll Actually Crave

Healthy salad recipes have an unfair reputation for being a little boring at best, and unsatisfying at worst. That might have something to do with the fact that we sometimes treat salads like an obligation or punishment—something meh that we should eat to "be healthy," rather than something we want to eat for both pleasure and nourishment.

In reality, a healthy salad can (and should!) be just as satisfying and enjoyable as your favorite sandwich or pasta—made with a textured mix of flavorful and nutritious ingredients you actually like. If you want your salad to be a filling meal (instead of a side or starter), go for a balance of carbs, protein, and fat in the form of veggies, grains, fruits, beans, legumes, cheese, meat, fish, eggs, plant-based proteins (like tofu), nuts, seeds, and oils, Abby Langer, Toronto-based R.D., previously wrote for SELF. Using a creative variety of hearty ingredients will ensure your salad provides you with enough energy and excitement to be a legit meal.

We rounded up 40 ideas for creating crave-worthy salads. These healthy salad recipes rely on an array of pantry staples and seasonal produce, and are largely substitution-friendly. (For instance, if you're not a fan of kale, swap in another sturdy leafy green, like collard greens or Swiss chard or if you're out of quinoa, use whatever grain you do have on hand.) Many happen to be vegan, vegetarian, or gluten-free, or can be easily adapted to be so. And almost all are suitable for some degree of meal prep. (Just wait to add anything wet or warm, like dressing or hot croutons, until you're actually ready to eat, in order to prevent unwanted sogginess.) You'll be happy to have a salad you actually look forward to eating ready to go in the fridge.

A note about the word healthy here: We know that healthy is a complicated concept. Not only can it mean different things to different people, it’s a word that’s pretty loaded (and sometimes fraught), thanks to the diet industry’s influence on the way we think about food. At SELF, when we talk about food being healthy, we’re primarily talking about foods that are nutritious, filling, and satisfying. But it also depends on your preferences, your culture, what’s accessible to you, and so much more. We selected these recipes with those basic criteria in mind, while also trying to appeal to a wide variety of nutritional needs and taste buds.


6 great ways to grill fruit and vegetables

With summer weather this nice, you want to cook outdoors if you possibly can. But you don’t have to put just meat on the fire -- vegetables and even fruit can grill up with terrific results. So grill farmers market produce for your dinner with one of these six recipes. Each makes for a substantial side or a light main course.

Grilled fig salad: One great way to use figs is in salads. Head out to the grill for this recipe, with radicchio and fennel quickly grilled over a hot fire. Figs are also grilled, the fruit cooked just long enough to caramelize some of their sugars and deepen their flavor. Toss the salad with goat cheese, walnuts and sherry vinaigrette for a simple dish.

Grilled eggplant with anchovies, garlic and rosemary: Stud thick wedges of eggplant with bits of garlic, anchovy and rosemary. The aromatic flavors work wonderfully with the eggplant, the wedges grilling up like thick steaks.

Grilled romaine with walnuts, Parmesan and anchovy dressing: Grilled tender hearts of romaine are tossed with a fresh anchovy dressing, toasted walnuts and shaved Parmesan for a salad or light dinner.

Green beans with pickled shallots: Green beans are quickly softened over the grill, then the lightly charred beans are dressed with olive oil, salt and tangy quick-pickled shallots. You can pickle the shallots ahead of time so they’re ready to go when needed.

Grilled eggplant with red and yellow peppers: For a colorful dish that gets you cooking outdoors, brush thick slices of eggplant with olive oil and throw them on the grill, topping with slow-roasted red and yellow peppers to add color and sweet dimension.

Grilled ratatouille: And for a fun take on ratatouille, toss the vegetables on the grill, as the light charring adding a nice smokiness to the dish. Here’s the recipe:


Warm Kidney Bean Salad

Try this bean salad as a side with barbecue pork or grilled chicken.

Ingredients:

  • 2 tablespoons extra-virgin olive oil
  • 2 cups onion, thinly sliced
  • 1 teaspoon dried oregano
  • 1/4 cup cider vinegar or red wine vinegar
  • 2 — (15-ounce) cans kidney beans, rinsed and drained
  • 1 teaspoon kosher salt
  • 1 cup chopped flat-leaf parsley
  • 1/4 cup green pimento-stuffed olives, sliced in half

Heat olive oil in a large pot over medium heat. Add onion sauté 5 minutes. Add oregano, vinegar and beans. Cook over low heat until beans are warm.

Remove from heat and stir in salt, parsley and olives. Serve warm or at room temperature.


Crispy chicken salad

From Raising The Salad Bar Beyond Leafy Greens: Inventive Salads With Beans, Whole Grains, Pasta, Chicken, And More Raising The Salad Bar Beyond Leafy Greens by Catherine Walthers

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