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Food & Wine's Dana Cowin to Publish Cookbook in 2014

Food & Wine's Dana Cowin to Publish Cookbook in 2014

The editor-in-chief of Food & Wine will release 'Mastering My Mistakes in the Kitchen'

Food & Wine's editor-in-chief Dana Cowin is releasing a cookbook, tentaitively out 2014, a press release says. Unfortunately for us, the book, Mastering My Mistakes in the Kitchen, will have nothing to do with how to achieve Dana Cowin's life, but rather it will share how to do things right in the kitchen. Ah, well.

"I love entertaining, but when I'm cooking I inevitably mess up a dish. With this book, I'm going to enlist the world's best chefs — extraordinary men and women I've gotten to know well during nearly two decades at FOOD & WINE — to tell me what I'm doing wrong and then show me how to master my mistakes," Cowin said in a press release.

So while we might get a couple of Cowin's own personal recipes, we'll most likely be hearing from Mario Batali on how not to screw up ravioli. Ecco, an imprint of HarperCollins Publishers, will be publishing Cowin's cookbook. Meanwhile, we'll just let the rest of our life go to shambles as Cowin teaches us to clean up our kitchen messes.


From Homemade Apple Roll-Ups to Butternut Squash Bread Pudding and from Spinach and Strawberry Salad to Grilled Tamarind Turkey Burgers and Baked Sweet Potato Fries, here are almost two hundred recipes that you and your family will enjoy.

RESTAURANTS BARBUTO • SANT AMBRO EUS CRITICS Waxing Italian
Jonathan Waxman is back , this time dishing . available at Barbuto , the best of
which is a crumbly lemon torte straight out of one of Alice Waters ' s early
cookbooks .

Category: New York (N.Y.)


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It's this book, Modernist Cuisine: The Art and Science of Cooking, co-authored by Fat Duck alum Chris Young and Maxime Bilet, that has lured us all to his lair. A tour of the facility reveals the kitchen, nestled into a corner of the building, an impressive machine shop on one side and a laser room and insectarium on the other (you can't very well study malaria without breeding mosquitoes, now can you?). What for us will become a makeshift dining room over the next few hours has been the nerve center for the book (to be officially released in March) over its three-and-a-half-year journey to realization. Outfitted with conventional kitchen equipment—stove, oven, mixers, etc—the cooking space is also home to a centrifuge, a freeze-dryer, and a roto-evaporator. And the fruits of this kitchen's labor? A 2,400-page, six-volume work chronicling almost every facet of cooking—but through the lens of a scientist, with an emphasis on culinary developments of the last 20 years.

Back in the conference room, Myhrvold begins a chapter-by-chapter presentation of each volume, while a solitary copy—apparently one of only a handful of sets to already reach the U.S.—is passed around the table. The first shipment, Myhrvold explains, is literally on that slow boat from China. While most publishers choose to print in China for economic reasons, he was after quality: the paper and ink, and the special stochastic printing process that produces the highest resolution possible. The striking photography throughout the book is integral: the recurring cut-away images that detail how heat transfers into and around food as it cooks combine the high-tech (slicing in half everything from a Weber grill to a microwave to a $5,000 oven) and the low tech (fixing plexi-glass to the pots to keep the food intact while shot).

"We pretty much begin with the discovery of fire, and go from there," Myhrvold explains as he cracks the spine of the first volume, "History and Background." The opening treatise takes the reader from Apicius to Escoffier to nouvelle cuisine and "The Seeds of Modernism," finishing with a 30-year timeline placing key techniques and innovators in context. Included among the fundamentals are in-depth overviews of microbiology and food safety, even nutrition and health issues. If there are any controversial findings expressed in the work, it might be found here, as Myhrvold takes issue with certain guidelines established by the FDA and suggests little evidence exists to support claims that olive oil is any better for you than bacon fat. The book began merely as a primer on sous vide cooking, a knowledge gap Myhrvold saw in need of filling as more and more chefs began embracing the technique. The second volume, "Techniques and Equipment," takes us there and far beyond.

As the dinner hour looms closer, we see the remaining volumes and Myhrvold interjects a few statistics for our amusement. If all the text were laid out in a single, 10-point line, it would stretch over six and a half miles. The project involved three dozen staff members at its peak. Another highlight of the set is the use of parametric tables, which transform mountains of data and countless hours of recipe testing into manageable references for, say, the production of a hot fruit gel—expressed in variables such as acidity, desired texture, and the chosen gelling agent. Another chart lays out a continuum of custards based on temperature and egg concentration (from 10 to 250 percent) and the resulting texture each equation will produce. With the third volume, "Animals and Plants," the reader is introduced to anatomy, butchering, and basic botany under the premise that cooks can't properly know how to treat an ingredient unless they have a basic grasp of its composition and microstructure.

Through volume four, "Ingredients and Preparations," and into "Plated-Dish Recipes," the fifth, all of this knowledge is applied to both original recipes and those inspired by or adapted from leading chefs from Alain Chapel and Frédy Girardet to Thomas Keller and Eric Ripert. Yet it's not all about haute cuisine and the contemporary avant garde. With equal vigor Myhrvold and his team approach omelets, hamburgers, and barbecue, even tofu. The sixth volume is a reproduction of all the recipes, in a suitable size and format to actually work from in the kitchen. As we head back into the lab, Myhrvold lets slip that a 30-course meal awaits. "We couldn't have you come all this way and not show off a little," Myhrvold grins.

NEXT: Liquid-nitrogen oysters, green pea "butter," and other highlights from the modernist meal

The three-hour procession of dishes—many just a single bite—highlight Myhrvold's efforts and offer a treetop view of what modern techniques and equipment have made possible. As Bilet and his team prepare and serve each course, Myhrvold circulates, explaining the products and processes in play. Wet pickles are compressed with starch and fried into crisp chips. Foie gras is blended with shallot jus and cognac in a laboratory homogenizer to produce what he calls a "constructed cream." We're served oysters, effortlessly shucked after a quick dip in liquid nitrogen. And spaghetti vongole is re-interpreted with geoduck clam filling in as the pasta itself.

Just past the halfway mark, we're served polenta with a marinara made not of tomato, but quince. House-made sea urchin "bottarga" is grated over a sheet of cocoa pasta meant to mimic kelp. King salmon is served as a vehicle for Myhrvold's "bullet-proof" beurre blanc, followed by a take on pastrami on rye, and, of course, barbecue.

If there is one aspect of cooking that Modernist Cuisine ignores, it's pastry, for which Myhrvold apologizes more than once to me and pastry chef Waylynn Lucas of Bazaar in Los Angeles. He is quick to point out that it is often through pastry chefs that many contemporary techniques, if not an overall mentality, seep into the larger, more traditional culinary realm. As we head into the meal's final courses, we're presented with fresh ricotta and a rich green pea "butter"—the pure fat that separates when peas are given a spin in the centrifuge. Pistachio nuts and sugar are emulsified into the smoothest, nuttiest ice cream possible. And as the meal ends on a whimsical note, we're served a plate of gummy worms, produced in a mold normally used to make fishing lures.

We slowly make our way out, with much on our minds to digest, and I corner Myhrvold and only half-jokingly suggest that a pastry edition should follow. "Let's see how this one plays out," he responds, for the first time showing any trace of concern over the book's reception. Earlier, I had asked Food & Wine's Dana Cowin if she saw potential for a breakthrough to a wider audience of cooks. She had admitted to an initial apprehension that it may only serve the interest of a sliver of chefs, but she is now excited about the book's broad scope and in-depth coverage. A representative from the kitchen store Sur La Table agreed, noting that even sous vide technology has become affordable enough for the home kitchen.

If a cookbook can come anywhere near the goal of having something for everyone, Modernist Cuisine definitely comes close. In his early review blurb, Tim Zagat proclaimed it "the most important book . since Escoffier." As we pile into our cabs at the end of the evening, he ponders revising that statement, acknowledging it may live on as the most important cookbook—ever.


Q&A with Food & Wine’s Dana Cowin at New Taste of the Upper West Side featured

Summer is officially upon us, and you know what that means – wedge sandals, BBQs, and food festivals! A few weeks ago, my festival season started off with a bang at New Taste of the Upper West Side in New York. The event showcased the growth of the UWS’s vibrant restaurant scene, with over 40 of the neighborhood’s most celebrated chefs presenting dishes using ingredients sourced from within 100 miles of the city.

New Taste of the Upper West Side

I attended Best of the West, the second evening of the two-day event honoring Dana Cowin, Editor-in-Chief of Food & Wine Magazine, and had the pleasure of snagging a few moments with the guest of honor herself (who also happens to be an UWS resident, a New York lifer, and fellow Brown alum!).

After graciously accepting her prize frying pan (much more practical than a trophy) from Monsieur Chocolat Jacques Torres, Dana and I got down to the good stuff: her cravings, highlights from that day’s roving lunch down the East Village, and Food & Wine’s evolution.

***** LMS: You get to travel a lot, tasting great food from all over the world. What do you crave from New York when you’re far from home?
DANA: Usually when I’m far from home I crave Sushi of Gari. I don’t eat sushi on the road because it’s probably not local to the place. Inevitably, if I’m eating abroad, I’m eating really deeply in one cuisine, and when I come back the thing I miss most is Asian.
LMS: What was the last great meal you had?
DANA: Oh boy…well, the last great meal is always the meal of the day. So, today I was at Rai Rai Ken, the ramen shop on 10th Street – oh my God. We had the shoyu ramen, which was excellent, and they had fantastic gyoza filled with vegetable and pork — they were really fresh and crispy, and not soggy…and then we went to Chikalicious for a hot fudge sundae. The hot fudge sundae is unbelievable. It has chocolate fudge, it has chocolate pearls—
LMS: Chocolate pearls?! Like tapioca?
DANA: Well, they’re crunchy. It’s sort of like a chocolate Rice Krispie, but round. [The sundae also had] kataifi, which is also sort of like Rice Krispies, but shredded, and roasted pistachios. [My son] William was like, I just wanted a little ice cream! And that’s why I’m eating all the rest of this. Then we walked down to Sigmund Pretzel, which was great. The ramen was great, the dessert was great…the traveling meal. Actually, weirdly enough, we went to this community garden and they were doing an improv class, so my son joined the improv class!
LMS: That’s fantastic. I’m a big fan of the traveling meal too — you never know what you can stumble upon, especially here in New York! Finally, right now must be the most challenging time to run a successful print publication. How has Food & Wine evolved to capitalize on all these new opportunities to reach readers online?
DANA: The really lucky thing about having an established brand is that when you transfer that brand to other media, you have such a leg up in terms of brand recognition. With Food & Wine, we’re able to translate it to iPad and online and apps, and reach our audience anywhere.

***** At this point, the 16-piece orchestra (Joe Battaglia and the New York Big Band) was really wailing on In the Mood, so we gave up trying to have a conversation and moved on to more fruitful pursuits by way of Damian Sansonetti’s (Bar Boulud) roasted suckling pigs.

Tartlettes filled with Blood Orange Lobster Salad (Milton Enriquez, Compass)

And so the noshing began. Milton Enriquez of Compass offered a refreshing Blood Orange Lobster Salad with edamame, avocado, mint, and Thai chili vinaigrette.

Chilled Spring Pea Soup with Whipped Mascarpone (Missy Robbins, A Voce)

The Chilled Spring Pea Soup with whipped mascarpone from Missy Robbins (A Voce) was a complementary next taste – silky, cool, and vibrant.

Jean Georges had our favorite bite of the evening, a fun take on sushi featuring a supple slice of fresh Salmon over a crispy fried Risotto Cake.

Magnolia Bakery Dessert Spread

And Magnolia Bakery ruled dessert with Lemon and Red Velvet Mini Cupcakes, Chocolate Wafer Whoopie Cookies with Vanilla Buttercream, Red Velvet Cheesecake, and Banana Pudding.


Mastering My Mistakes in the Kitchen: Learning to Cook with 65 Great Chefs and Over 100 Delicious Recipes Kindle Edition

⋞lightful. candidly humorous. accessible. sure to motivate home cooks to head fearlessly for their kitchens and try these tempting ideas. The simple and tasteful dishes are accompanied by extremely helpful tips. Cowin's culinary education makes for a charming and important book for both would-be and accomplished chefs."--Publishers Weekly (starred review)

"[Cowin] promises not just cooking lessons from master chefs, but cookable recipes from them, and a few life lessons along the way. Having lived with [Mastering My Mistakes in the Kitchen] for over a month, I'd have to say she delivers on all counts."--Bookotron

"In her new cookbook, Mastering My Mistakes in the Kitchen, Cowin embarks on a journey to improve her cooking--and to give readers easy, smart tricks that will help them, too. The resulting cookbook is densely packed with advice that will turn anyone into a better cook."--Today.com

"The end result is gorgeous, simple recipes that even a rank beginner can manage. Plus, you get to see some of your favorite celebrity chefs hamming it up in Cowin's kitchen."--NPR, Best Books of 2014

"This cookbook is charming and encouraging-a breath of relief for all of us who worry about our skills in the kitchen."--The Kitchn

"[An] entertaining (and educational!) cookbook."--Seattle King 5- TV / New Day NW --This text refers to an alternate kindle_edition edition.

From the Inside Flap

For years, Dana Cowin kept a dark secret: From meat to vegetables, broiling to baking, breakfast to dinner, she ruined literally every kind of dish she attempted to make. Now, in this cookbook confessional, the vaunted first lady of food and exceptional entertainer finally comes clean about her many meal mishaps. With the help of friends--all-star chefs, including Mario Batali, Alex Guarnaschelli, and Tom Colicchio, among many others--Cowin takes on 100 recipes dear to her heart. Ideal dishes for the home cook, each recipe has a high "yum" factor, a few key ingredients, and a simple trick that makes it special. With every dish, she acquires a critical new skill, learning invaluable lessons along the way from the hero chefs who help her discover exactly where she goes wrong.

Hilarious and heartwarming, encouraging and instructional, Mastering My Mistakes in the Kitchen will inspire anyone who loves a good meal but fears its preparation. Featuring gorgeous full-color photography, it is an intimate, hands-on cooking guide from a fellow foodie and amateur home chef, designed to help even the biggest kitchen phobics overcome their reluctance, with delicious results.

--Seattle King 5- TV / New Day NW --This text refers to an alternate kindle_edition edition.

About the Author

Dana Cowin, Food & Wine's editor-in-chief since 1995, has been covering the world of food, wine, style, and design for more than thirty years. She sits on the board of directors of City Harvest, a New York City hunger-relief organization Wholesome Wave, dedicated to providing access to sustainable foods and Hot Bread Kitchen, an organization that helps train low-income men and women to join the culinary workforce. In 2012, she was an inductee into the James Beard Foundation's Who's Who of Food & Beverage in America. She is an alumna of Brown University and lives in New York City with her husband and two children. To read more about Dana's adventures, follow her at @fwscout on Twitter and Instagram.

--This text refers to an alternate kindle_edition edition.

From the Back Cover

For years, Dana Cowin kept a dark secret: From meat to vegetables, broiling to baking, breakfast to dinner, she ruined literally every kind of dish she attempted to make. Now, in this cookbook confessional, the vaunted first lady of food and exceptional entertainer finally comes clean about her many meal mishaps. With the help of friends--all-star chefs, including Mario Batali, Alex Guarnaschelli, and Tom Colicchio, among many others--Cowin takes on 100 recipes dear to her heart. Ideal dishes for the home cook, each recipe has a high "yum" factor, a few key ingredients, and a simple trick that makes it special. With every dish, she acquires a critical new skill, learning invaluable lessons along the way from the hero chefs who help her discover exactly where she goes wrong.

Hilarious and heartwarming, encouraging and instructional, Mastering My Mistakes in the Kitchen will inspire anyone who loves a good meal but fears its preparation. Featuring gorgeous full-color photography, it is an intimate, hands-on cooking guide from a fellow foodie and amateur home chef, designed to help even the biggest kitchen phobics overcome their reluctance, with delicious results.

--Seattle King 5- TV / New Day NW --This text refers to an alternate kindle_edition edition.


Julia's Afternoon Cake

  • Yield: One 8-inch cake
  • Prep time: 20 mins
  • Cook time: 25 mins
  • Total time: 45 mins

A fragrant, humble, not-too-sweet cake that’s perfect with afternoon tea or a late morning cup of coffee. While Julia uses all-purpose flour, I used a little buckwheat flour as it’s earthy flavor compliments the citrus and almond meal so beautifully. The color of the cake is a darker brown because of the buckwheat flour — if you use 100% all-purpose flour it will be more of a light golden brown. To make the cake nut-free, simply omit the ground nuts.


Food & Wine's Dana Cowin to Publish Cookbook in 2014 - Recipes

There is very strong research to indicate that the best way to get your kids to eat healthy foods is to start by getting them to cook (and to plant a vegetable garden). Here are a few kids’ books to choose from.

From the publisher: “ChopChop, The Fun Cooking Magazine for Families, has introduced families to the joys and benefits of cooking together since 2010. Now, we’ve expanded the boundaries of the magazine in a new cookbook: CHOPCHOP: The Kids’ Guide to Cooking Real Food with Your Family. Complete with family-favorite recipes from the magazine plus dozens of new recipes, the ChopChop cookbook will inspire home-cooked meals like never before.”

Where to Purchase: Amazon, Barnes & Noble, ChopChopmag.org, Walmart
Cost (on Amazon): $16.71

From the publisher: “Opening up the magic world of cooking to children, Alice Waters describes, in the words of seven-year-old Fanny, the path food travels from the garden to the kitchen to the table. Teaching kids where food really comes from not just from the market but from farms and people who care about the earth, Fanny at Chez Panisse has lessons on the importance of eating with your hands, of garlic and of composting and recycling. It is also a delightful beginner’s cookbook with 46 recipes that will tempt children into the desire to cook and eat with whole hearts, alert minds and all the senses. From banana milkshakes and green apple sherbet to cherry tomato pasta and black beans and sour cream, as well as spaghetti and meatballs, french fries and pizza, there is something here for every child to prepare and enjoy.”

Where to purchase: Amazon, Barnes & Noble, Books-A-Million, Harper Collins Publishers, Indie Bound

From the publisher: “It’s Nonna Mima’s birthday, and Nonna Lidia and her grandkids are determined to throw her a surprise feast! While planning the evening’s menu, Nonna Lidia shares her memories of growing up on the farm during each season of the year, gardening her own fruits and vegetables, and being surrounded by animals of all kinds. After a trip to the farmers’ market, Lidia and the kids prepare a pasta primavera, perfect for a family celebration!

“Renée Graef’s warm, heartfelt illustrations capture Lidia Bastianich’s love for her family and the food that they share. Included are eighteen recipes that emphasize the ingredients abundant during each season and the use of leftover ingredients, while “Kids Can” suggestions note ways that kids can participate in the making of the meals.

“Whether you are looking for an intergenerational family story or are a fan of America’s favorite Italian chef, Nonna’s Birthday Surprise delivers a savory treat.”

Where to purchase: Amazon, Barnes & Noble, Running Press

From the publisher: “Put the fun back into healthy eating with this bright and colorful cookbook. This lively collection encourages kids to consider what they eat and how it affects their bodies, without preaching. Yummy interpretations of old classics, as well as new recipes destined to become classic help turn eating into a delicious treat.”

Where to purchase: Amazon, Barnes & Noble, Dorling Kindersley

From the publisher: “The Mayo Clinic Kids’ Cookbook is much more than just a fun and colorful recipe collection. It teaches the basics of good nutrition with a short, illustrated introduction written at kids’ reading levels. Kids will learn how the pieces of a healthy diet fit together in the Mayo Clinic Healthy Weight Pyramid. They’ll learn that snacking can be a very good thing ­ provided they choose the right snack. They’ll learn how to plan a meal, using the simple idea of dividing a dinner plate into four quadrants (for vegetables, fruits, protein and grains). They’ll even learn how to create proper portion sizes without counting calories or using a scale. There’s even a brief kitchen equipment list of about two dozen items, plus a dozen safety tips, all to help make the kitchen kid-friendly. In addition, specific safety tips are included with recipes as needed, to remind kids when to ask for adult help (such as when working with knives or hot water). The editors have even included subtle tips to help kids “unlearn” old kitchen habits that aren’t healthy, such as adding salt to the water when cooking pasta.”

Where to purchase” Amazon, Barnes & Noble, Mayo Clinic Store

From the publisher: “Get ready to help with dinner for real! Are you a kid? Then this book was written especially for you. With it, you can become a fantastic cook and amaze your friends with pita spirals and creamy corn soup or cinnamon swirl sticky buns and best hot chocolate. Or you can fill your lunch bag with a wedge of spaghetti pie, a plateful of not-from-a-box macaroni and cheese, a tall glass of homemade excellent soda, a bowlful of maple yogurt fruit dip, and a handful of honest pretzels that you made yourself.

Are you a grown-up? Then welcome to another very special cookbook by Mollie Katzen. In these pages she speaks directly to children through 65fully kid-tested, illustrated recipes that require only a little adult assistance. It’s not just a cookbook full of yummy recipes–it also gives young cooks, ages eight and up, a chance to practice reading, math, and logic skills. And think of the sense of accomplishment they will feel as they grow into creative, confident home cooks.”

Where to purchase: Amazon, Barnes & Noble, Penguin Random House

From the publisher: “In the much-anticipated follow-up to Pretend Soup, celebrity chef Mollie Katzen cooks up 20 new vegetarian recipes that kids six and under can prepare themselves (with a little help from their adult assistant). The last decade has seen unprecedented demand in healthy eating for kids. Taking this interest one step further, Mollie Katzen presents kid-friendly recipes that will inspire joyful kitchen adventures and food appreciation. With Salad People, children will enjoy a lifelong love and playful respect for nutritious food from Tiny Tacos, Counting Soup, Salad People, and beyond. Complete with kitchen tips, safety and behavior rules compiled by actual kids, and thoughtful observations on what children gain from cooking, Salad People is the model children’s kitchen guide for a new decade. All-new recipes make the perfect companions to Pretend Soup recipes.”

Where to purchase: Amazon, Barnes & Noble, Penguin Random House

The River Cottage Family Cookbook (Ten Speed Press)

Author: Hugh Fearnley Whittingstall and Fizz Carr

From the publisher: “A distinctly educational cooking primer for the whole family with more than 100 recipes that can be made by children. Written by a father of three and a mother of five who perfected the recipes with help from their kids and their kids’ playmates. Ideal for passionate parents who want to instill in their children a love of healthy food handmade from fresh, natural ingredients.”

Where to purchase: Amazon, Bares & Noble, Thrift Books

From the publisher: “Following the huge success of The Silver Spoon (the most influential and successful Italian cookbook of the last 50 years), this edition, adapted especially for children, presents 40 authentic, quick, wholesome and easy-to-make Italian recipes that kids 10 and above will love to cook and eat. The recipes have been chosen for their simple instructions, fresh and healthy ingredients and delicious flavor, and are guaranteed to appeal to the fussiest of children.

A specialist in the field of children’s food and nutrition has selected the recipes to ensure they are well balanced, safe and perfect for children to use. The book is fully illustrated throughout, using specially commissioned illustrations to add a lively and charming feel as well as photographs of the finished dish. The Silver Spoon for Children makes cooking fun, clear and accessible for children aged 10 and up.”

Where to purchase: Amazon, Barnes & Noble, Phaidon

From the publisher: “Every year children flock to the Sylvia Center at Katchkie Farm in upstate New York to learn firsthand about where fresh food comes from, how to grow it, how to harvest it, and how to use it to prepare great-tasting meals. Now Sylvia’s Table brings these lessons and recipes straight from the farm to your kitchen in a deliciously unique cookbook for families. From Hudson Valley Corn Bisque to Butternut Squash Bread Pudding and from Grain-Stuffed Peppers to Cilantro-Chile-Spiked Cod Burgers to Shakshuka, here are almost 200 recipes that you and your family will enjoy. Featuring recipes from the friends of Katchkie Farm, chefs like Michael Romano of Union Square Cafe and Jonathan Waxman of Barbuto culinary experts including Food & Wine’s Dana Cowin cookbook authors Giuliano Bugialli, Rozanne Gold, Deborah Madison, and, Sara Moulton and many others, this is a family cookbook guaranteed to be loved by cooks (and kids) of all ages.”


Sylvia's Table Fresh, Seasonal Recipes from Our Farm to Your Family

Every year children flock to the Sylvia Center at Katchkie Farm in upstate New York to learn firsthand about where fresh food comes from—how to grow it, how to harvest it, and how to use it to prepare great-tasting meals.

Every year children flock to the Sylvia Center at Katchkie Farm in upstate New York to learn firsthand about where fresh food comes from—how to grow it, how to harvest it, and how to use it to prepare great-tasting meals. Now Sylvia’s Table brings these lessons and recipes straight from the farm to your kitchen in a deliciously unique cookbook for families. From Homemade Apple Roll-Ups to Butternut Squash Bread Pudding and from Spinach and Strawberry Salad to Grilled Tamarind Turkey Burgers and Baked Sweet Potato Fries, here are almost two hundred recipes that you and your family will enjoy.

Featuring recipes from “the friends of Katchkie Farm”—chefs like Michael Romano of Union Square Cafe and Jonathan Waxman of Barbuto culinary experts including Food & Wine’s Dana Cowin cookbook authors Giuliano Bugialli, Rozanne Gold, Deborah Madison, and, Sara Moulton and many others—this is a family cookbook guaranteed to be loved by cooks (and kids) of all ages.

“Rarely do we appreciate cooking for what it is: an act of sharing. That’s exactly what Liz Neumark reminds us in this remarkable book. With its generous blend of storytelling and farm-to-table wisdom, Sylvia’s Table is less a cookbook than an invitation—into Liz’s family, her work (as a New York caterer, farm owner and pioneering advocate for children’s health), and most important, her kitchen. It’s a vibrant and inspiring place to be.”
—Dan Barber, executive chef and co-owner, Blue Hill

“Liz Neumark is one of the most dynamic women in food—and her food is incredibly delicious to boot! She always knocks it out of the park with the freshest, seasonal and succulent ingredients straight from her farm to your table.”
—Padma Lakshmi, author of Tangy, Tart, Hot & Sweet

“As a chef and a father with three kids of my own, I think it is so very important to educate kids and parents on healthy eating and to start good eating habits with children right from the start. I’m a huge supporter of what the Sylvia Center is doing and I hope you enjoy this cookbook and cooking with your family as much as I do. Happy cooking always!”
—Chef Todd English


Sylvia’s Table: Farm-Fresh Cookbook On Sale Now

Every year, children flock to the Sylvia Center at Katchkie Farm in upstate New York to learn firsthand about where fresh food comes from—how to grow it, how to harvest it, and how to use it to prepare great-tasting meals. Now Sylvia’s Table brings these lessons and recipes straight from the farm to your kitchen in a deliciously unique cookbook for families. From Homemade Apple Roll-Ups to Butternut Squash Bread Pudding and from Spinach and Strawberry Salad to Grilled Tamarind Turkey Burgers and Baked Sweet Potato Fries, here are almost two hundred recipes that you and your family will enjoy.

Featuring recipes from “the friends of Katchkie Farm”—chefs like Michael Romano of Union Square Cafe and Jonathan Waxman of Barbuto culinary experts including Food & Wine’s Dana Cowin cookbook authors Giuliano Bugialli, Rozanne Gold, Deborah Madison, and, Sara Moulton and many others—this is a family cookbook guaranteed to be loved by cooks (and kids) of all ages.


Autumn leek and mushroom bisque

From Sylvia's Table: Fresh, Seasonal Recipes from Our Farm to Your Family Sylvia's Table by Liz Neumark and Carole Lalli

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  • Categories: Soups Dinner parties/entertaining Fall / autumn Vegetarian
  • Ingredients: shallots leeks rosemary thyme chanterelle mushrooms dried porcini mushrooms cremini mushrooms oyster mushrooms vegetable stock


Watch the video: Xhibition Kitchen Presents: Food u0026 Wine Editor Dana Cowin (January 2022).