Traditional recipes

Peanut-Sesame Sauce

Peanut-Sesame Sauce

Ingredients

  • 2 small garlic cloves, minced
  • 1 1/2 teaspoons minced fresh ginger
  • 3/4 cup roasted salted peanuts
  • 3/4 cup sesame seeds, toasted
  • 6 tablespoons grapeseed oil or vegetable oil
  • 1 small red Thai chile or red jalapeño chile
  • 1/4 to 1/2 teaspoon cayenne pepper

Recipe Preparation

  • Stir sugar, garlic, and ginger in heavy nonstick skillet to blend. Cook over medium heat without stirring until sugar melts and caramelizes to dark amber color, about 3 minutes. Scrape mixture out onto piece of parchment paper. Let mixture cool and harden, about 15 minutes.

  • Place peanuts, sesame seeds, oil, chile, and 1/4 teaspoon cayenne pepper in blender. Break up garlic mixture; add to blender. Puree until paste forms, scraping down sides of jar as needed (most sesame seeds will remain whole). Season sauce to taste with salt and cayenne pepper. Transfer to small bowl. DO AHEAD Can be made 3 days ahead. Cover and refrigerate. Bring to room temperature before using.

Recipe by Jean Georges VongerichtenReviews Section

Luscious Peanut Sesame Sauce

This is a sauce, a combination of three sauces. It is a good thing that my family has always kept in stock and has a good price. It’s used to spread bread, eat hot pot, steamed buns, mix noodles, cook, and eat as much as you want. Anyway, it is a word, incense!Ingredients used: 100g peanuts, 100g walnuts, 50g sesame seeds, 15g sugar, 3-5g salt


Related Video

Really tasty on the cold sesame noodle 66! I didn't have enough peanuts and all I had on hand was Thai flavored cashews. but really I think that made it extra delicious!

More work than it's worth. Just ok, but a lot of time and expense.

This is an excellent "stand alone" peanut sauce to make and store. I use it w/chicken or pork. Found it when searching for a peanut sauce after reading a recipe that sounded great, but the peanut sauce that accompanied it was panned. This is an excellent substitute for the sauce in the "coconut-lime shrimp w/peanut sauce" on this site.

I was searching for a peanut sauce after reading another shrimp recipe w/peanut sauce wherein the peanut sauce was considered not good to baddddd. This is a very tasty sauce to use in any recipe that calls for peanut sauce. I use it w/chicken or shrimp.

It's designed to go with Cold Sesame Noodles in the same issue (http://www.epicurious.com/recipes/recipe_views/views/231439)

USE IT FOR WHAT? Odd that this recipe sits out here like this with nothing attached to it. It seems like a satay sauce recipe, but no chicken? No pork on a stick?


Recipe Summary

  • Reynolds Wrap® Non-Stick Foil
  • 12 chicken wings
  • ½ cup creamy peanut butter
  • ⅓ cup water
  • 2 tablespoons lime juice
  • 2 tablespoons reduced-sodium soy sauce
  • 1 tablespoon honey
  • 1 teaspoon toasted sesame oil
  • ½ teaspoon ground ginger
  • 1 small clove garlic
  • 1 tablespoon fresh cilantro leaves, packed
  • 1 tablespoon sesame seeds, toasted

Preheat broiler. Line a 15x10x1-inch baking pan with Reynolds Wrap® Non-Stick Foil*. Set pan aside.

Cut off and discard tips of chicken wings. Cut wings at joints to form 24 pieces. Put wing pieces into a large bowl set aside.

Combine the peanut butter, water, lime juice, soy sauce, honey, sesame oil, ginger, and garlic in a food processor or a blender. Cover and process or blend until smooth. Remove 1/3 cup of the sauce add it to the chicken wings and stir to coat evenly. Add the cilantro to the remaining sauce in the food processor or blender and process or blend until combined. Set aside. Arrange chicken pieces in a single layer in prepared pan.

Broil wings 4 to 5 inches from the heat for 10 minutes. Turn wings. Broil about 10 minutes more or until tender and brown. Drain off fat.

Place wings on a platter to serve, sprinkle with sesame seeds, and serve with the reserved peanut sauce.


Peanut Sesame Zucchini Noodles

I wasn’t that I expected my dad, who turned 62 years old this March, to work all his life and never retire.

It’s just that my dad has always been such a hard worker. He’s the epitome of productivity and an efficient manager of time, and to be honest with you, I don’t think I’ve ever seen my dad not work.

Daddy’s the sort of person who always needs to maximize his time.

Somehow, a long time ago, he was imprinted with the need to make full use of time, to always be constantly doing something.

This is him: checking the news between bites of breakfast oatmeal or reading an e-book on his iPad while waiting to in the lobby to be called for his doctor’s appointment.

I remember that when I was still just a little girl, Daddy would come home from a long day at work, have a quick dinner, and then head to my parents’ room where he’d be spend the next few hours studying for his part-time accountancy course until the wee hours of the morning. He’d eventually only stop poring over his books when his body gave way to sheer exhaustion and he’d fall asleep in his armchair, whichever book he was reading still cradled in his arms, his head tilted to one side, snoring deeply.

And then, when he wasn’t studying for any course in particular, he’d make sure to keep up with the latest news or be updated on new skills, simply so he wouldn’t fall behind. Even today, Daddy is still constantly learning new things all the time, working on new projects (like designing our house from scratch with a ruler in one hand and a pencil in the other or using hydrophonics to grow vegetables at home). I think my dad’s idea of fun is to maximize every single minute of his time.

That’s why it’s so hard to believe that Daddy’s retiring in less than two weeks.

It probably will be a huge change for him, and I was worried that the change might be too drastic once he has so much free time on his hands.

However, when I asked him about retirement, my dad simply sent me a text message saying “Now I will have more time to explore and learn new things,” followed by a long list of activities he plans to do once he officially retires (including writing e-books, developing apps, learning new IT skills, traveling, golfing, investing in more shares, and the list goes on.)

I suppose I worried for nothing. It seems like Daddy won’t be bored at all.

If anything, Daddy’s attitude of constant learning and working hard has left a strong impression on me.

Sometimes, I realize that I do have some of Daddy’s characteristics, which have become particularly obvious to me during the past few months as I’ve been working non-stop writing my e-cookbook.

As I work on tying the loose ends of the book together, learning so many new things along the way, I’m reminded of Daddy’s hardworking spirit and determination to always better himself.

I’m so grateful for the dad I have – that he’s been such a great example of what it is like to work at something long and hard enough that it eventually manifests in something real and tangible.

Daddy worked hard at his job and climbed the corporate ladder in order to provide us, his family, with a comfortable life in which we lacked nothing. He constantly aimed to improve our standard of living, and instilled in us the value of sheer persistance and good work ethics. If anything, I am so incredibly proud of the dad I have.

Thank you for everything Daddy! I love you. Happy Father’s Day.

Today’s recipe is dedicated to my dad – because noodles and peanuts fall in the universe of foods that he likes.

This is a lighted up version of Asian peanut sesame noodles instead of using wheat noodles, this 15-minute meal incorporates refreshing zucchini noodles (so easy! so fun!).

You can either shred the zucchini into noodles with a julienne peeler like mine, or use a spiralizer like this. Once the zucchini is shredded into thin noodles, process peanuts, water, sesame oil, soy sauce and chilli sauce in your blender or food processor until you get a thick, creamy sauce of your desired consistency.

From there, it’s literally peanuts! Pour sauce over the zucchini noodles, garnish with chopped peanuts, sesame seeds, and spring onions – and enjoy!


Peanut dressing brings an Asian vibe to the dinner table. We love serving this with our garlic ginger chicken. A few other recipes that go well are:

This is a versatile recipe that can be used as a sauce, dip, or marinade. Here are a few options:

  • As a marinade for chicken or tofu.
  • A dip for veggies.
  • Or a spring roll dip.
  • A sate sauce for your roast chicken or vegetables.
  • Mix it into some rice.
  • Pour it over just about anything on your plate.

Easy Peanut Sauce

Try this easy peanut sauce recipe once, and you'll want to have it on hand at all times. It's perfect for jazzing up noodles, salads, bowls, and more!

Does anyone else absolutely love peanut sauce? Creamy, spicy, savory, and a little sweet, it’s a sauce that I’m equally happy drizzling over dinner or enjoying straight off a spoon. I can’t get enough!

This peanut sauce recipe the first thing I turn to whenever I want to jazz up a simple stir fry, bowl, or salad at home. It’s super easy to make, and it calls for basic pantry ingredients that you likely already have on hand (no fish sauce here!). Peanut butter gives it creamy texture, rice vinegar or lime juice makes it nice and tangy, tamari or soy sauce adds salty depth of flavor, and sriracha spices it up. Finally, to sweeten my peanut sauce recipe naturally, I add maple syrup instead of brown sugar. That’s it!

How to Use Peanut Sauce

Once you have peanut sauce on hand, you’ll find a thousand ways to use it. Here are just a few of my favorites:

  • Drizzle it over roasted veggies like broccoli, cauliflower, or Brussels sprouts. Add a sprinkle of red pepper flakes and sesame seeds for garnish!
  • Toss it with a salad or slaw.
  • Add it to a grain bowl made with quinoa, cauliflower rice, or cilantro lime rice and tofu or tempeh for protein!
  • Use it as a dip for your favorite fresh veggies.
  • Stir it into easy peanut noodles or pad Thai.
  • Serve it as a dipping sauce with lettuce wraps, summer rolls, or spring rolls.

Start by making this easy peanut sauce recipe as written, but then, feel free to play with it! I suggest a few variations in the recipe below, like adding ginger, minced garlic, or sesame oil for a bolder flavor. You could also swap the nut butter! Almond butter, cashew butter, or even tahini would work well here. And sometimes, I use coconut milk instead of water to make it extra creamy and rich.


Peanut sesame shirataki noodles

The peanut sauce is a bit of a hodge-podge based on what I had, but turned out so tasty — like, lick-the-bowl tasty. Not that I did that. Ahem. I like mine a little on the less spicy side, so feel free to add in red pepper flakes or hot sauce if that’s your style.

Let’s see how it’s made AND check out the skimpy calories and carbs!

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1 pound Chinese-style noodles (or any spaghetti-type pasta)
2 tablespoons dark sesame oil

Dressing
6 tablespoons peanut butter
1/4 cup water
3 tablespoons light soy sauce
6 tablespoons dark soy sauce
6 tablespoons tahini (sesame paste)
1/2 cup dark sesame oil
2 tablespoons sherry
4 teaspoons rice wine vinegar
1/4 cup honey
4 cloves garlic, minced
2 teaspoons minced fresh ginger
2 tablespoons hot pepper oil (see instructions below)*
1/2 cup hot water

Garnish (optional, depending on taste)
1 carrot, peeled and shredded
1/2 firm medium cucumber, peeled, seeded, and julienned
1/2 cup roasted peanuts, coarsely chopped
2 green onions, thinly sliced

Cook noodles in large pot of boiling unsalted water over medium heat until barely tender and still firm.

Drain immediately and rinse with cold water until cold. Drain well and toss noodles with (2 Tbsp) dark sesame oil so they don't stick together.

FOR DRESSING: Combine all ingredients except hot water in a blender or food processor fitted with steel blade and blend until smooth. Thin with hot water to consistency of whipping cream.

Just before serving, toss noodles with sauce. Garnish with cucumber, peanuts, green onion, and carrot shreds. Serve at room temperature.

Dressing will keep well indefinitely in the refrigerator. Use about 2-4 heaping Tbsp. of dressing per pound of noodles.

*Hot Pepper Oil: Amount you use depends on how hot you like it. 2 Tbsp. will give it a nice "bite." If your tastes run to the very hot, you might want to use 3 Tbsp.

If you don't want to buy the oil "ready made" in the market, here's a recipe: 1/4 cup hot red pepper flakes, 1 cup oil.

Combine in a saucepan over medium heat. Bring to boil, and immediately turn off heat. Let cool. Strain in small glass container that can be sealed. Refrigerate.


Directions

Step 1

PREHEAT broiler. Line a 15x10x1-inch baking pan with Reynolds Wrap® Non-Stick Foil*. Set pan aside.

Step 2

Cut off and discard tips of chicken wings. Cut wings at joints to form 24 pieces. Put wing pieces into a large bowl set aside.

Step 3

COMBINE the peanut butter, water, lime juice, soy sauce, honey, sesame oil, ginger, and garlic in a food processor or a blender. Cover and process or blend until smooth. Remove 1/3 cup of the sauce add it to the chicken wings and stir to coat evenly. Add the cilantro to the remaining sauce in the food processor or blender and process or blend until combined. Set aside. Arrange chicken pieces in a single layer in prepared pan.

Step 4

BROIL wings 4 to 5 inches from the heat for 10 minutes. Turn wings. Broil about 10 minutes more or until tender and brown. Drain off fat.

Step 5

PLACE wings on a platter to serve, sprinkle with sesame seeds, and serve with the reserved peanut sauce.

How to Line a Pan

Turn pan upside down and press a sheet of foil around it. Remove foil, flip pan over, and drop foil inside. Crimp the edges and you're ready to cook! Make sure that the non-stick (dull) side is facing down toward the pan when pressing foil around the pan. The non-stick side of the foil liner will be facing up toward the food when dropped inside the pan.